UPDATE: Jimmy Henchman Found Guilty In NYC Drug Case

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A New York City jury has found a rap industry agent guilty of federal drug-trafficking charges. The verdict was reached Tuesday at the Brooklyn trial of James “Jimmy Henchman” Rosemond. The head of New York-based Czar Entertainment was charged last year with running a coast-to-coast drug ring that used music equipment cases to transport cocaine and drug money. The 47-year-old Rosemond had claimed he was framed.

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Can Rap Lyrics Teach Us About Business?

Rap News, Hip Hop News - GUTTA WORLD


Date: Thursday – February 23, 2012

Hip hop artists love flaunting their money – but can they teach us anything about how to make it?

Ben Horowitz, a leading Silicon Valley venture capitalist, certainly thinks so. He told the BBC World Service how listening to rap music had helped him to make critical business decisions.

“It’s mostly what I listen to, but it also turns out to be very relevant to business, in terms of the issues that come up.

“A lot of it is about business and about competition. A lot of it is about feelings, about how something might make you feel.”

Mr Horowitz, co-founder of Andreessen Horowitz, which has made a fortune from investments in firms such as Groupon and Skype, said that when it came to big strategic decisions feeling can be more important than logical thought.

“For me to have a whole class of music that really helped me articulate all that in my mind, and then articulate in my writing, as well has been a big deal,” he said.

Adam Bradley, associate professor of African American literature at the University of Colorado, also believes rap contains lessons in charismatic leadership they don’t teach in business school.

“Rap presents an immediate test. If you get up on the stage and your are whack, you are going to get booed off. You have to present yourself in the moment and you have to move the crowd. I think there is a lesson there in leadership because it’s about creating pathways of connection,” he says.

Conspicuous consumption is part of hip-hop culture
“It’s not only to do with what you want them to do, but what they want to do but may not know it yet.”

Rap also offers lessons in “self-presentation” for the aspiring business mogul, argues Bradley, who advises major corporations on black culture and music.

So what are the set texts from the hip hop business school – and what can they teach us?

It’s All About The Deal

I take quarter water sold it in bottles for two bucks, Coca-Cola came and bought it for billions, what the [expletive] ? – I Get Money, 50 Cent

Curtis “50 cent” Jackson is known as one of hip hop’s sharpest business operators. In I Get Money, from his second album, he boasts about a deal with Coca-Cola, who paid $4.1bn for Glaceau, a vitamin water company he had taken a 10% stake in through an investment vehicle.

The deal is said to have landed Jackson between $60m and $100m, putting his net worth at close to $0.5bn. “Quarter water” is a reference to the small plastic bottles of flavoured water Jackson and his friends used buy for 25 cents when they were children in the New York ghetto.

The rapper, whose debut album was entitled Get Rich Or Die Trying, is currently at the the centre of controversy over a share tip he gave to his 3.8 million followers on Twitter, in a company in which he is an investor and shareholder.

Work Hard And What Your Costs

Get your money right, be an international player, don’t be scared to catch those red-eye flights / You better get your money right, ’cause when you out there on the streets, you gotta get it – get it – Get Your Money Right, Dr Dre

Another noted hip hop entrepreneur, Andre “Dr Dre” Young, is third in Forbes magazines list of wealthiest rappers, with an estimated net worth of $250m. He added an estimated $175m to his fortune in 2011 with the sale of a 50% stake in headphone company Beats Electronic.

In 2007′s Get Your Money Right, Dr Dre joins forces with Jay-Z, whose $450m empire includes restaurants, fashion, music and a share in the New Jersey Nets basketball team, to give what amounts to a seminar in how to start a small business (once you have stripped out the expletives and drug references).

“Don’t be worried ’bout the next man – make sure your business tight,” the pair advise, before adding, in a crucial lesson for all would-be entrepreneurs: “If you ain’t in it for the money then get out the game.”

Be Your Own Boss

I can’t let life get the best of me, I gotta take, take control of my own destiny / Control what I hold and of course be the boss of myself / No-one else will bring my wealth – A Job Ain’t Nothing But Work, Big Daddy Kane

“When hip hop was born, it was born with that sense of being ‘on the hustle’ or ‘on the grind,’” says Bradley, author of Book of Rhymes: The Poetics of Hip Hop.

“Part of it comes from an underworld parlance, an underground parlance, of criminal enterprises, selling drugs.

“You could be working a block selling drugs, but extrapolate it and it means working hard. It means labour, a commitment to a work ethic, and that sense of struggle.”

Founders Make Better Chief Executives

You’re just a rent-a-rapper, your rhymes are Minute Maid / I’ll be here when it fade to watch you flip like a renegade – Follow the Leader, Rakim

“The interesting thing about Rakim, in addition to being the first great rapper, he was kind of a founder of rap music,” says Ben Horowitz.

“When rap music started it was kind of like a start-up music genre and it wasn’t clear at all that it was going to succeed.”

Rakim’s message to those who were jumping on the rap bandwagon, but did not really believe it had a future, struck a chord with the venture capitalist.

“It was like that’s the difference between the founding CEO and the professional CEO. The professional is often just there to make money but he is not there for the movement, he is not there for the mission… in the way that the founder is and you see that in business all the time.”

Never Show Weakness

I’m runnin’ the buildin’, don’t make me run in the buildin’ / No this ain’t the first time I had my gun in the buildin’ – Scream On Em, The Game

“If you just want pure, unadulterated swagger to come pouring out of you, there is no better soundtrack than hip hop – whether you are going out on to the sporting field, or going into the boardroom,” says Adam Bradley.

“Hip hop is a soundtrack for aggression. It is music created mostly by young men and consumed mostly by young men.”

Ben Horowitz told the New York Times he sent the “superaggressive” lyrics of Scream on Em, by The Game, to an executive he felt was being too deferential and needed to show more strength.

The Game’s Manager, Jimmy Rosemond, Turns Himself In To The FEDs

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The Game’s manager, Jimmy “Henchman” Rosemond, turned himself in to the FEDs yesterday (May 23) for his alleged involvement in a cocaine drug ring. The Czar Entertainment Co-CEO manages a slew of talent like Sean Kingston, Brandy, Akon and Mike Tyson; he recently came forward in an interview with XXLmag.com on the matter:

“With the Name of God, the Gracious, the Merciful I have decided to break my silence to address slanderous media once and for all. Firstly, I want to apologize to every music artist and executive I’ve worked with. In addition, I apologize to my family and friends who have had to endure this horrible situation.

The events over the past week, to say the least, have caught me off guard. Although I have been aware of an investigation-taking place over the last four years, I was never informed that an arrest warrant had been issued in my name. I first learned about that warrant through the media when the news was released last week.

The purpose of this statement is not to assert some kind of grandiose conspiracy theory, but I will state some facts. These prosecutors have already begun my trial through the media and I’m releasing this statement in order to set the record straight. I just want a fair trial. I came up from nothing and made some mistakes early in my life of which I have already served time. Since then I have worked hard to establish my career in the music industry only to be targeted by these opportunistic prosecutors with a personal vendetta against me.

I would like to expose the two prosecutors spearheading this slanderous and trumped up case against me. The first, prosecutor Todd Kaminsky, is a 33-year-old White hip-hop head that if he weren’t a lawyer he would probably be a member of the Beastie Boys. Second, Carolyn Porkony, who failed in convicting the Murder Inc. Irv Gotti brothers on, trumped up charges of money laundering. Both have a personal stake in pursuing me and will stop at nothing to bring down an innocent man.


I have endured slanderous media for quite some time. Last year, in their frustration, they employed Chuck Phillips and the Daily News to write baseless stories in the media saying I was a snitch (but never mentioned or produced one person I ‘snitched’ on) to hopefully get people to start cooperating with their bogus investigation. Chuck Phillips started a campaign against me and wrote dozens of letters to inmates serving considerable time in federal prison begging them to cooperate. When those tactics didn’t work, they subpoenaed every person that knew me or worked with me in the music industry, including my accountants, lawyers, secretary, etc.

What compels me to expose this is that I know if I don’t I will not get a fair trial. Todd Kaminsky is hanging his hat on this case and has gone beyond his office to make sure he sensationalizes this to propel himself to some high-end law firm or political office. This is obvious from the deals he has already given his ‘witnesses’ to testify against me. Henry “Black” Butler, a known rolling 60’s gang member, and wife Leah Daniels who are Kaminsky’s star ‘witnesses’ were arrested with drugs and machine guns in Los Angeles. Butler was promised five years and his wife got her case dismissed in exchange for implicating me in their operation. I know nothing of Butler’s criminal activities and was never involved with him concerning those criminal activities. I just know him as a self-proclaimed gangbanger who told jokes all the time and worked for Loud Records in the 90’s. They leaked all this false information about me to the media and left out the truth that Henry Butler denied my involvement until he was promised a reduced sentence of five years if he included me in his operations. There’s absolutely no evidence that supports my involvement in any of this, yet I have been implicated with someone I have no associations with. Through our own investigations, we have compiled a lot of information that proves the prosecutors are overly zealous and aggressive, not to mention unconstitutional. They gave witnesses immunity and have gone as far as to threaten individuals with indictments if they didn’t talk to them about me and corroborate their tales. For instance, Ali “Zo” Adam, whose serving 18 years was offered a lesser sentence and the witness protection program if he testified against me. He refused saying he couldn’t live with the lie but admitted he was tempted by the offer. Many were tempted with the prospect of freedom and hence a case with no evidence was born against me. THIS IS NOT JUSTICE.

Khalil Abdullah’s indictment was leaked in the media as well. I never saw my name on that indictment, and I don’t know what I have to do with whatever he’s been indicted for. Up to now I don’t know what I may be charged with or what crime I’ve committed. For the last 10 years I’ve dedicated myself to servicing the music community but because of my so-called ‘checkered past’, I’ve become an easy target for prosecutors Todd Kaminsky and Carolyn Porkony, not to mention fiction writers like Chuck Phillips and his Daily News cohorts.

If the government is relying on informants like Winston “Winnie” Harris, a convicted drug dealer and Jamaican deportee, who came to me and motioned via hand signal that he was forced to wear a wire and begged me to skip town or Dexter Isaac who is serving life in prison plus 30 years then I’m sure I will not be offered a fair trial. Where’s the real proof that I have committed these crimes? I just want my fair trial and to not be railroaded as they so eagerly want to do.

A fair trial is afforded by the constitution and witnesses should be forthright without pressure or duress. That’s all I want and I’ll turn myself in today.

Again, I apologize to my peers, artists and family for being subjected to all of this.”

Rosemond’s attorney, Jeffrey Lichtman, said, ”Although a federal prosecutor told me that there is an arrest warrant out, [but] they refuse to provide me with the warrant or a copy of the charges.”

This latest brush with the law adds on to Rosemond’s colorful past; he’s been imprisoned during the ‘90s and was charged with gun possession in Los Angeles a few years ago. Last year, Rosemond was exposed as a state and federal police informant dating back to the mid-90s. In the court documents, Rosemond’s attorneys asked for leniency in his weapon’s charge case because he helped Brooklyn prosecutors send a man to jail.

He received a lot of backlash in the Hip-Hop Community because of his alleged snitching — something viewed negatively on the Rap scene.

Rosemond’s client, The Game, released an album entitled Stop Snitchin/Stop Lyin in 2005 voicing his hatred towards anyone helping law enforcement officials. Rosemond denies ever cooperating with officials on any case and staunchly proclaims his innocence in the drug ring conspiracy.

Czar Entertainment was in the midst of filming Dead Presidents 2 and Cookout 2 before Rosemond’s legal problems began. Czar Entertainment couldn’t be reached for questioning and the charges remain undisclosed at this time.

Source

Suge Knight’s $1 Million Lawsuit Against Kanye Tossed

Posted: Friday – November 5, 2010

Former Death Row Records honcho Marion “Suge” Knight was defeated in court yesterday (November 4th), when a federal judge in Miami tossed his $1 million lawsuit against Kanye West.

Knight claimed West was responsible for a 2005 shooting after during a pre-VMA party at The Shore Club in Miami in 2005.

According to Knight’s lawsuit, he would have never been shot if security had been tighter during the party, which was attended by celebrities like The Game, Eddie Murphy, The Black Eyed Peas and others.

According to the Associated Press, a Miami federal judge ruled there was no evidence to prove that a shooting during the party was foreseeable.

Knight also lost a 15 carat diamond studded earrings valued at $150,000 during the fracas. No one has ever been charged with the shooting.

Source

The Game Is Being Sued For Unpaid Fees

Posted: Tuesday – October 13, 2009

The Game is once again in a bit of trouble, this time with his own lawyers. The Cali emcee is being sued by his lawyers for failing to pay close to $35,000 in fees according to multiple reports. The legal firm, Kinsella Weitzman Iser Kump & Aldisert (why do law firms always have the longest and most confusing names?) filed the lawsuit in the L.A. County Superior Court claiming that the Game has an outstanding bill on the work they did for his 2007 gun charge case.

In related news, The Game faced five years behind bars for the charge the law firm is suing over but only ended up doing eight days in jail. In the lawsuit the lawyers say that even though they got the rapper off with a “successful outcome,” he still hasn’t paid them for their work. Beyond court, The Game is currently working on his new album. Cool & Dre recently talked about working with Game on his upcoming “R.E.D.” album saying they have recorded almost ten songs already with the California emcee. “Since we have that chemistry, I think a lot of producers could just crack ‘I can’t do nothin’ right now! Like, listen to these beats!’ and we’ll knock out like three, four in one night, one session,” Cool explained.

Source: DrewReports



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