Lil Boosie Charged With Smuggling Drugs Into Prison

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Maybe you’ve only heard of Lil Boosie in passing, or perhaps you’ve never heard of him at all. His songs have never earned regular local radio play, and his influence west of the Rockies is usually relegated to street rap diehards and those who read their RSS feed intravenously.

But in the South, his influence is omnipresent, crossing racial and class divides. He’s a cult figure with a mass following, a high-top faded and ferocious performer perennially enduring some sort of struggle (whether it’s women, diabetes or triumphing over illegal downloading to buy a candy-painted car).

From his first days as a member of C-Loc’s Concentration Camp clique to being promoted as the next Trill star by Pimp C, to his classic mixtapes, to a trio of solo albums released on Asylum Records, Boosie has earned a reputation as one of the rawest rappers in the South, a region known for unfiltered flamboyant personas.

Alas, it’s also a region known for the frequency with which its most popular artists are incarcerated. Over the last few years, T.I., Gucci Mane, Lil Wayne, Mystikal and Lil Boosie have been incarcerated for various indiscretions. Yet Boosie’s charges trump them all.

While it’s dificult to parse his current legal woes, at the moment he is facing charges ranging from ordering the murder of rivals (a charge that could get him the death penalty) to various conspiracy charges to distribute and smuggle narcotics into a federal penitiary. And on Monday, he was indicted on charges of trying to smuggle codeine into a second state prison. The indictment comes from a May 25 charge that Boosie and two local men had been attempting to smuggle in the banned substance. If convicted, it could lead to two to four years being tacked onto Boosie’s prison time.

Ignoring speculation about his guilt or innocence, it’s sad to watch one of the most singular voices of his generation get shut down. With his sinister amphibian croak, Boosie rapped about many of the same tropes as his peers, but he always conveyed greater anguish, sincerity and unfiltered passion. He created music to triumph over adversity, which resonated with anyone going through any sort of woe. He also stole the show on “Wipe Me Down,” which remains one of the funnest songs of all time.

Recently, a bootleg mixtape compilation of his most recent work has cropped up. Downloading it is recommended. Of local interest is “California,” a paean to the streets of L.A. and its most famous cash crop.

Lil Wayne Going To Jail Is Like Elvis Being Drafted, Bun B Says

Posted: Friday – March 12, 2010

‘I don’t think anything like this has happened in music since Elvis got drafted into the Army,’ he says.

Bun B has been friends with Lil Wayne since he was a teenager. The Houston legend said having Wayne out of the music game for a year will be a greater loss than people are realizing.

“I feel bad, because I don’t think anything like this has happened in music since Elvis got drafted into the Army,” Bun B said. ” … Let’s just keep it real: Lil’ Wayne is not just the biggest rapper, Lil Wayne is the biggest pop star right now. Maybe Susan Boyle is on his level. But when you talk about music, nine times out of 10, Lil Wayne’s name is gonna come into the conversation. I feel bad for any brother or any sister that’s gotta go to jail. I feel especially bad for a person like Lil Wayne who’s really riding the wave right now. But he don’t have a lot of time. He’s doing it on the Island. As wild and as ill as the Island is, I think at the same time, he’ll be all right. When you in that state jail and you dealing with those lifers, you got a lot of other issues at hand.”

While in jail, Wayne should just focus on serving his time productively and not worry about fellow inmates, Bun said.

“I don’t think it will be smart for him to go to general population,” he said. “A person like Lil Wayne doesn’t have to prove anything to anybody in general population exposing themselves to that yard. It’s not about being real. It’s too many people who have way too much to gain, and [there is] so much he could lose by trying to prove something. … That’s nota good look. … It’s a little bit different when a person like Lil Wayne goes to jail. All we can do is pray for him. Pray for his spirit.”

Bun, who championed his late musical brother Pimp C years ago when Pimp was in prison, said he admires the attitude Wayne’s musical family has in this tough time.

“I just left Miami. People [were] trying to keep their heads up and sprits up while the young man was around, but they are hurting,” Bun said. “One thing I noticed from the Young Money camp is that they’re not being down because of their careers and they’re worried about a co-sign. They are worried about a friend. That’s what I see from Drake, Nicki, Stunna. … These people are concerned about a friend going to prison.”

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