Nelly Is Getting His Own Reality Show On BET

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According to a recent report on The Hollywood Reporter, Nelly will be getting his on reality series on BET.

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50 Cent Analyses Mistakes With G-Unit

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50 Cent reflected on the past recently. Speaking to HardKnockTV, the G-Unit captain spoke candidly about his role in the crew, and the mistakes he felt he had made. 50 explained that he was responsible for keeping the fans and public aware of the other members of G-unit, despite his own career taking off in such a successful way. “A lot of people here may not know every member of D-12 by name or every member of the St. Lunatics,” he continued.

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UPDATE: Nelly Tour Bus Busted For Drugs

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St. Lunatics rapper Ali comes to Nelly’s rescue by posting a conversation that the two shared about a recent traffic stop in Texas that could’ve cost Nelly big money and even bigger problems.Ecstasy, heroin, weed and weapons were found in Nelly’s tour bus. Ali who happens to be one of Nelly’s best friends took it upon himself to prove the Apple Bottom’s creator had nothing to do with the drugs being brought onto his tour bus. Nelly was detained in Texas and one of his roadies was booked for bringing a large amount of heroin, weed and a loaded weapon on Nelly’s tour bus.

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Nelly Busted For Drugs

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Rapper Nelly was detained near the Mexico border after cops uncovered a loaded gun and drugs stash on his tour bus. US checkpoint officers found dozens of sachets of heroin and a duffel bag containing over 4.5kg of cannabis during a routine stop on Wednesday evening in Sierra Blanca, Texas. Shockingly, a loaded .45 caliber pistol was also discovered amongst the drugs. But police eventually released the Grammy-winning rapper and arrested one of his seven-strong entourage, who took responsibility for the items.

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Rapper Nelly ‘sued by American Express over an unpaid $20K credit card bill’

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First there were reports that Nelly had lost all of his money due to gambling and then stories surfaced about foreclosure.

Now it is alleged that the rapper is being sued by American Express for running up a $20,403.64 credit card debt.

The 37-year-old Country Grammar performer has sold more 21 million albums in the United States alone.

But he is said to have been having money troubles for months – if his ex-manager is to be believed.

In May it was reported that the hip-hop star whose real name is Cornell Iral Haynes, Jr had reportedly lost all his money because of a gambling problem and was facing losing his home to foreclosure.

However Nelly insisted the stories were false and he even took to Twitter debunk the claims.

‘I no some hoping that 4closure statement is tru but I’m sorry EPIC FAIL!’ Nelly tweeted.

TMZ is now reporting that Nelly owes $20,403.64 to American Express.

The credit card company filed a lawsuit against the star in Missouri in October to try and get their money back, including $3,000 in attorney’s fees. A court hearing is scheduled for January 9.

The Mail Online contacted Nelly’s representatives, but so far they have not responded.

The Texas native has also had to address rumours of steroid use in the past after a celebrity drug dealer named the star as one of his long list of high-profile clientèle back in 2008, but Nelly quickly fired back.

‘The only people who say that is people who don’t work out. Anyone who goes to the gym knows what Nelly is doing is nothing,’ the rap star said during a 2008 interview when he was asked about the rumours.

The rap artist has been dating R&B singer Ashanti since 2004.


R. Kelly Is Losing His Chicago Crib

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Hip-hop crooner R. Kelly, who has had his share of legal issues in the past, is facing another: He may lose his mansion near Chicago to foreclosure. J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. has filed a foreclosure action against the singer, whose real name is Robert Sylvester Kelly, saying he hasn’t paid his mortgage in a year.

With the foreclosure, Kels, as he is known to some fans, joins a long list of rap and R&B stars before him who failed to pay their mortgage bills.

Last year, we reported that Chamillionaire, the lyrical mind behind the hit single “Ridin,’” defaulted on the loan for his Houston mansion. Atlanta-based “Prince of the South” and southern gangsta rapper Lil Scrappy was reportedly foreclosed on late last year, along with his girlfriend Diamond, of the hard-core rap group Crime Mob. Rapper Xzibit, of “Pimp My Ride” fame, faced the music in 2009, after missing $21,000 in payments on his California home. Hip-hop record executive Damon Dash lost his TriBeCa duplex last year to foreclosure. Even Nelly (remember “Country Grammar” and “Hot in Herre”?) was accused by a former manager of being in danger of losing his home to foreclosure, although he denies it.

All of this brings up some interesting questions about hip-hop artists and their thoughts on real-estate, one’s obligations vis-à-vis private property and debt, and the economic crisis. We know from their lyrics that rappers love money, and claim to have a lot of it. We also know from music videos and TV shows like MTV’s “Cribs” that rappers also like big houses and flashy cars. But does foreclosure even register with rhyme-sayers, or are they too busy living the high life to care?

Rap Genius, a website devoted to hip-hop lyrics, shows that 12 hip-hop songs contain the word “foreclosure,” and 7 more with some variation of the word “foreclose.”

Staten Island native and Wu-Tang protégé Trife Diesel, for example, in his song “World Today,” which starts with an audio sample of Barack Obama giving a speech about the economy, raps, “FDA approved medicines, killing off us Americans / Homes in foreclosures, we being kicked out of residence / It’s time to represent, for our next to kin.” He stops short of proposing a solution to the foreclosure crisis, but offers this analysis of tightening of mortgage-lending standards by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac: “People with A1 credit can’t afford steak sauce.”

Other rappers have taken on the economy, too. Statik Selektah, for example, in “So Close, So Far,” wistfully imagines a world without the GM and AIG bailouts and the subprime loan mess: “Wouldn’t it be nice if the banks didn’t f— up the loans / And people ain’t have to move out they homes? … That the world I’m talkin’ about is where we would like to be / Worried about debts, recessions and foreclosure…”

Perhaps not surprisingly, a lot of rappers are in caught up in foreclosures of their own doing. Chicago’s Real Estate Daily, citing an unnamed source, reported that R. Kelly “stopped making payments on the mortgage in an attempt to force the bank to negotiate a modification of the loan.” It’s a tactic adopted by many American homeowners, who find that banks are unable or unwilling to negotiate a new loan or interest rate for them unless they have missed payments. Chamillionaire’s case, too, was a strategic default, or so he told celebrity-news website TMZ last year.

If we are to believe the hype, hip-hop artists probably have the money to pay their mortgages, but seeing continuing weakness in the housing market, choose not to.

From the point of view of economic self-interest, you can hardly blame them. Wasn’t it Ice-T who first said, “Don’t hate the playa / Hate the game”?

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