Lil Boosie Charged With Smuggling Drugs Into Prison

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Maybe you’ve only heard of Lil Boosie in passing, or perhaps you’ve never heard of him at all. His songs have never earned regular local radio play, and his influence west of the Rockies is usually relegated to street rap diehards and those who read their RSS feed intravenously.

But in the South, his influence is omnipresent, crossing racial and class divides. He’s a cult figure with a mass following, a high-top faded and ferocious performer perennially enduring some sort of struggle (whether it’s women, diabetes or triumphing over illegal downloading to buy a candy-painted car).

From his first days as a member of C-Loc’s Concentration Camp clique to being promoted as the next Trill star by Pimp C, to his classic mixtapes, to a trio of solo albums released on Asylum Records, Boosie has earned a reputation as one of the rawest rappers in the South, a region known for unfiltered flamboyant personas.

Alas, it’s also a region known for the frequency with which its most popular artists are incarcerated. Over the last few years, T.I., Gucci Mane, Lil Wayne, Mystikal and Lil Boosie have been incarcerated for various indiscretions. Yet Boosie’s charges trump them all.

While it’s dificult to parse his current legal woes, at the moment he is facing charges ranging from ordering the murder of rivals (a charge that could get him the death penalty) to various conspiracy charges to distribute and smuggle narcotics into a federal penitiary. And on Monday, he was indicted on charges of trying to smuggle codeine into a second state prison. The indictment comes from a May 25 charge that Boosie and two local men had been attempting to smuggle in the banned substance. If convicted, it could lead to two to four years being tacked onto Boosie’s prison time.

Ignoring speculation about his guilt or innocence, it’s sad to watch one of the most singular voices of his generation get shut down. With his sinister amphibian croak, Boosie rapped about many of the same tropes as his peers, but he always conveyed greater anguish, sincerity and unfiltered passion. He created music to triumph over adversity, which resonated with anyone going through any sort of woe. He also stole the show on “Wipe Me Down,” which remains one of the funnest songs of all time.

Recently, a bootleg mixtape compilation of his most recent work has cropped up. Downloading it is recommended. Of local interest is “California,” a paean to the streets of L.A. and its most famous cash crop.

Tech N9ne Bringing Lil Wayne, B.o.B Into His World

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Among his underground following, Tech N9ne can do no wrong. But his fans, appropriately dubbed the Technicians, did get a little uppity when news broke that the Kansas City, Missouri, rap veteran would be collaborating with the likes of Lil Wayne on Tech’s recently released All 6′s and 7′s.

“No, I was not afraid of the backlash because I was getting it when Wayne said he wanted to work with me to [Hot 97 DJ] Funkmaster Flex when he was in Rikers,” Tech N9ne told MTV News during an intimate sit-down at his Strange Music headquarters in Lee Summit, Missouri. “All of my fans, a lot of my fans were like, ‘Oh no, don’t f— with Wayne. No, no, no, he’s mainstream and you’re underground — it don’t mix.’ ”

In October 2010, while still serving his eight-month prison bid for gun possession, Weezy revealed to Flex that he would like to work with Tech. For Tecca Nina, Wayne’s name-drop was an introduction point for new and curious fans, but for his long time die-hards, there was some skepticism.

“Different artists are supposed to hook up and make something beautiful, that’s what makes music wonderful, I think,” Tech said, defending against criticism that he was selling out. “I already knew what I was gonna do. When I get with these [well-known collaborators], the beats gotta say their names.”

The resulting collabo is “F— Food,” a raunchy track that not only features Weezy, but T-Pain on the hook as well. The song’s lyrical depiction of explicit sex acts will make it a hard sell for radio, but then again according to Tech, airplay was never the point of the union. “Everybody else is just going to try to put it on radio and big hit, boom and get their money off these cats. Nah, I just want to do beautiful music,” he said.


The Young Money CEO isn’t the only popular rapper to appear on All 6′s and 7′s, Atlanta’s B.o.B also lends his production and lyrics to the project on “Am I a Psycho?.” The dreary track is a far cry from Bob’s 2010 radio hits “Nuthin’ On You” and “Airplanes.” Tech remembers the feeling he got when he first heard the beat and often reminds fans of B.o.B’s oft-overlooked lyrical prowess.

“I chose it like, ‘Whoa,’ he did the beat and he did the chorus and I said, ‘That’s my world right there,’ and he wrote a verse for it. He’s a lyricist,” he said before citing Bob’s very first single, 2007′s “Haterz Everywhere,” as further proof. “That was thugged-out; that was gutter. I ain’t forgot B.o.B; he supposed to expand. But I know he can go, so we did ‘Am I a Pyscho?’ with Hopsin.”

Snoop Dogg, Busta Rhymes, Twista, Yelawolf, Kendrick Lamar and Stephen Carpenter of the Deftones also appearances on All 6′s and 7′s, but Tech N9ne puts any notions that he’s going mainstream to rest. “I brought people into my world,” he said.

What do you think of Tech N9ne joining forces with Lil Wayne? Tell us in the comments!

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Young Jeezy, DJ Drama Reunite On The Real Is Back

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With his oft-delayed fourth solo album, TM 103, in label limbo, Young Jeezy took it back to basics and reunited with DJ Drama on his latest mixtape, The Real Is Back.

Jeezy and Drama together, that’s a clear win-win, man,” Drama told Mixtape Daily. “N—as gonna stop actin’ like we ain’t built this. You like our style, you watch our style, we still own our style.”

As self-serving as his boasts may seem, Drama and Jeezy are credited with popularizing a unique brand of trap music that has dominated Southern rap since the early 2000s. At first, the rap/DJ tandem were inseparable, starting with their 2004 tape Tha Streetz Iz Watchin’ and their 2005 classic Trap or Die. A rift then started to grow between the two, but in December 2009 Jeezy appeared on Drama’s “Gangsta Grillz Radio” show on Atlanta’s 107.9 and they buried the hatchet.

Now the duo are back to work, returning to grace on The Real Is Back. “Me and Drama had a couple of conversations. When I came through the station, we chopped it up. We was talkin’ about doin’ another tape because we had so much history as far as The Streets Is Watching, Trap or Die, the list goes on and on,” Jeezy said. “It just was time, the streets needed it. So I had to get in the studio, had to do my whole one, two thing. As usual, he was on point.”


The tape is filled with street-centered anthems like the kinetic “How U Want It.” The track features a menacing instrumental on which Jeezy employs his patented slow flow and trap-raps. “How you want it, hard or soft/ Get ‘em in, get ‘em off,” the Snowman spits.

Lil Wayne appears on “Ballin’,” while Fabolous helps out on “Rollin’.” Still, Jeezy keeps his ear to the street and also collaborates with underground ATL spitter Alley Boy as well as CTE’s new signee Freddie Gibbs on “Run DMC” and “Do It for You.” There are no attempts at big radio singles here, just hard-edged street-hop.

“We invented the wheel when it comes to that type of music and that type of tape so we just did what we did,” Jeezy said of his reunion with Drama. “I felt like I wanted to take it back to what I do. Young Jeezy, nothing else. I’m not trying to sell this to nobody, I’m trying to do what I did in the beginning: go hard.”

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Wiz Khalifa Clears Beef Rumors

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It seemed as if every musician in the world was at Bonnaroo this past weekend, and none were more excited to be there than Wiz Khalifa. The Black & Yellow rapper performed on Saturday evening and rocked the crowd the entire time.

“I was feeling the energy the whole time,” says Khalifa. “I’ve been doing a lot of shows and growing as a performer and an artist, so I just wanted to build on all that,” he told MTV News following the performance. “Being a top act on such a huge stage in front of so many people, it’s a great starting point for my career, because a lot of people work their whole careers and then get here.”

Khalifa admitted that this was probably one of his biggest shows since he first broke on the scene last year. This is surprising, because he just performed at Hot 97’s Summer Jam concert with the likes of Lil Wayne and Drake.

At Summer Jam last weekend, there was an incident that involved Khalifa and Waka Flocka Flame. The Taylor Gang General had this to say about the alleged incident: “Yeah, nothing happened backstage,” Khalifa said. “It’s always something; making up some rumor about something happening with me backstage during somebody’s set, but nothing happened. Me and Waka and are cool. That’s just people trying to promote negativity.”

Some wonder how true Khalifa’s story is but at this time we have to take his word for it.

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Exclusive: Lil Wayne, Birdman Hit With Third Lawsuit In One Week

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Rappers Lil Wayne and Bryan “Birdman” Willams have been hit with their third lawsuit this week, as music publishing company to Bridgeport Music filed a lawsuit against the pair yesterday (June 10th).

Bridgeport Music filed the lawsuit against Cash Money Records in the Central District of California Western division yesterday.

The copyright infringement lawsuit claims Birdman illegally sampled the song “You and Your Folks, Me and My Folks,” a tune by Funkadelic off their classic 1971 album Maggot Brain.

The pair allegedly illegally used the sample on the track “Army Gunz,” taken from Birdman’s 2006 album Like Father, Like Son.

Bridgeport’s action is the third lawsuit brought against Lil Wayne, Cash Money and Young Money this week alone.


On June 9th producers Play-N-Skillz sued Lil Wayne for $1 million over unpaid royalties related to the track “Got Money” from his hit album Tha Carter III.

Last Friday (June 3rd), Lil Wayne was hit with a $1.5 million dollar lawsuit by producer David Kirkwood, who claims he’s owed unpaid royalties from Lil Wayne’s label Young Money, as well as Cash Money Records.

In March, Lil Wayne was sued for $20 million by producer Darius “Deezle” Harrison over unpaid royalties for his work while Tha Carter III.

Producer Bangladesh also sued over Tha Carter III, seeking his portion of royalties for his production work on the album.

Lil Wayne is currently preparing for the release of Tha Carter IV, which will be released in August.

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Lil Wayne Is ‘Lonely At The Top’ But Fears The Bottom

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Few artists ever reach the heights Lil Wayne has, and for the Young Money captain, that is both a gift and a curse. And it’s a dilemma that Weezy tackles on “Nightmares of the Bottom,” a new track off the New Orleans lyricist’s upcoming album Tha Carter IV.

After performing the track for the first time during the taping of his “MTV2 Presents: Lil Wayne Unplugged,” set to air Sunday on MTV, MTV2 and MTV.com, the self-proclaimed Martian broke down the song’s meaning. “I mean simply, sleeping at the top with nightmares of the bottom,” Wayne told MTV News’ Sway. “Everybody says it’s lonely at the top. It is lonely, so I dream, though, and the only thing I dream about is being down there with the people that ain’t lonely. Thank God I am alone.”

With eight solo albums and more than 10 million records sold, Wayne has tasted too much success to see his stock dip, so for him, a fall back to earth is a definite fear, he admitted.


“And that’s simply what it is: nightmares of the bottom,” he added before rapping the song’s lyrics: “Sleeping at the top/ Nightmares of the bottom/ Everybody wanna be fly, until you swat ‘em.”

Lil Wayne Unplugged” features Tunechi performing acoustic versions of his already classic catalog and places Weezy in the same class as hip-hop luminaries Jay-Z, Lauryn Hill and LL Cool J, who also took the unplugged stage.

Lil Wayne is an amazing choice for Unplugged as he is at hip-hop’s forefront — leading a new generation of artists whose appeal spans across music genres and playlists,” Amy Doyle, MTV’s executive vice president of music and talent, said in a statement. “Lil Wayne’s skills, influence, and catalog are a powerful addition to the legacy of artists who have rocked the ‘Unplugged’ stage.”

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