Why Do Rap Artists Love Suicide Doors?

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Date: Monday, January 9, 2012



Suicide doors—often referred to by automobile manufacturers as “coach doors” and “freestyle doors”—are car doors that are hinged on the side closer to the trunk rather than at the front. Sometimes rear-hinged rear doors are combined with front-hinged front doors (as in the photo above) to create a yawning effect when both doors are open. Popular in the early 20th century, suicide doors were largely abandoned by car manufacturers after the 1960s. They began reappearing sporadically, however, on new models in the late 1990s and early 2000s, around the same time they began appearing in rap lyrics.

Why did suicide doors fall out of fashion after WWII? It may have something to do with the fact that they’re not terribly practical. By some accounts, getting into and out of cars with front-hinged front doors and rear suicide doors requires careful maneuvering, since—if there’s no pillar between the doors—the front door must be opened before the back door can open. But the alternative, a rear suicide door that’s not secured by a conventional front door, can be dangerous: If the suicide door becomes unlatched while the car is in motion, the air flow will throw it open, making it very difficult to close. One automobile journalist has suggested that suicide doors may have been a murder weapon of choice among 1930s gangsters (and that the very name “suicide doors” may be gangster innuendo)—if you want to throw someone out of a car, it’s much easier to get his door open if it’s hinged at the rear than at the front. And suicide doors have been associated with 1930s outlaws in the popular imagination; consider the titular characters’ car in Bonnie and Clyde, or gangster-movie icon James Cagney in this photo.

This association might go part of the way toward explaining why suicide doors are so popular in hip hop lyrics, which often draw on gangster imagery. Songs like Jay-Z and R. Kelly’s “The Return” and 50 Cent’s “Gunz Come Out” place the term “suicide doors” in close proximity to allusions to gun violence. Suicide doors evoke an Al Capone-era vibe that jibes with the threatening demeanor rappers often cultivate.

More commonly, though, suicide doors are presented in hip-hop as luxury items. Relatively unusual on contemporary cars, suicide doors are a marker of an old or rare automobile—or one owned by someone wealthy enough to make complicated aftermarket modifications to his vehicle. Tity Boi mentions that his suicide doors are on a Bentley (“Call Tiesha”), while Wigs of Theodore Unit boasts that his suicide doors are on his “0-5 Benz” with “lazy-eye lights and the apple suede floors” (“It’s the Unit”). Gorilla Zoe’s “Take Ya Shoes Off” is an ode to a car that has not only suicide doors but also “mink seats bucket” and “suede on the roof”—a car so opulent that Gorilla exhorts everyone wishing to enter it to remove his or her footwear first.

Some romantically minded lyricists have used suicide doors’ capacity to open wide as a metaphor for sex. In “69,” T-Pain invites the object of his desire—for whom he has “been doin’ tongue exercises”—to exchange oral sex “in the back of my Lincoln with the suicide doors.” Juelz Santana’s analogy in “New Star in Town” is less subtle: “Let me open up your legs like suicide doors,” he pleads.

This request may not be a persuasive one, but Santana’s simile works (recall the yawning effect), and it highlights the symbolic richness of suicide doors: They can credibly evoke death, money, and sex—a lyricist’s trifecta.

REVIEW: CAM’RON & VADO – Gunz N’ Butta

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Harlem, New York rappers Cam’ron and Vado recently dropped the studio album Gunz N’ Butta this month. For the past year, the duo released a few mixtapes to showcase the new rap crew, U. N., including the successful Boss Of All Bosses mixtape. Their official debut U.N. album was entitled Cam’ron & The U.N. Presents: Heat In Here, Vol. 1 and released in May 2010.

The chemistry between Cam and Vado make for a dope duo, the wordplay from each rapper is on point and the gutter, street sound is prevalent within the album’s production. Cam’ron is in his true form, effortlessly cocky and witty. His young protege Vado is just as boastful and braggadocios. On the track I Luv U, each rapper takes turns dropping bars over a classic “boom-boom-bap” beat. Don’t let the track title fool you, this track is definitely hardcore.

Cam’ron is usually the first voice we hear on each track, but on the party song We All Up In Here, Vado gets to spit first and is fabulously arrogant about his lush life and swagger. The track Monster Muzik gives us the classic sound of the original Dipset rap crew with a beat that represents New York’s grit. A part of me would have liked to have heard Juelz Santana bless this track, just once, for old time’s sake.

Mixtapes almost always sound better than the actual studio album. On this album, the duo managed to keep most of their street integrity while providing radio friendly tracks. I think that Gunz N’ Butta is just a tip off the iceberg of what’s to come. This album serves as a preview of what we can expect on upcoming solo projects from the U.N. artists. This album was a good effort and definitely deserves a listen.

Standout Songs: “I Luv U”, “We All Up In Here”, “Monster Muzik”

Tracklisting:

1. Killa
2. American Greed
3. Heat In Here
4. Face Off
5. I Luv U
6. Put A Bird Up
7. Monster Muzik
8. Breathe
9. Fuck A Freestyle
10. Lights, Camera, Action (Feat. Skylnn)
11. Stop It 5
12. Speaking In Tungs
13. Hey Muma
14. We All Up In Here
15. They Don’t Like You
16. Be With Me

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Rap World Shocked over the Death of Huddy 6

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Posted: Thursday – Oct. 14, 2010

Rap music suffered another tragedy yesterday as high-profile rapper/promoter Andre Hudson, better known as Huddy 6, died in a car accident on the George Washington Bridge.

Port Authority spokesperson Steve Coleman said: “The driver was traveling southbound towards New Jersey on the George Washington bridge when his vehicle struck a truck. Hudson was pronounced [dead] on the scene and the female passenger was taken to a local hospital.” (MTV.com)

Outside of his work with rapper Mase’s Harlem World rap group in the late 90s, Huddy 6 was best known for his long-time relationship with Cam’ron, who credits Huddy for saving his life after he was shot twice in 2005.

Since his death, fellow artists have Tweeted the impact it has made upon them:

Busta Rhymes: “I can’t believe that we just lost a good brother, friend and fellow comrade (Huddy 6). U R Already being truly missed! God bless ur (sic) whole family.”

Juelz Santana: “A! R.I.P. HUDDY 6 @hud6 SMFH if u don’t or didn’t know who he was jus know this, he was HARLEM!!!!.”

Ron Browz: “R.I.P. Andre Hudson. Aka Hud6 HuddyCombs. Aka MR Harlem!”

N.O.R.E.: “Damn it’s a real sad day right now that shit fucked my mind up for real can’t think str8 right now r.i.p huddy.”

Rap has seen its share of deaths in 2010 with the loss of Boston rapper Guru (Keith Edward Elam) in April, 90s rapper Apache (Anthony Peaks), and Killa Sha (Sha Lumi) of The Super Kids. Huddy will be remembered for his work in progressing the Harlem rap scene.

Hell Rell Accuses Jim Jones Of Stealing Royalties In Lawsuit

Posted: Wednesday – September 9, 2009

The beef between former Dipset members Hell Rell and Jim Jones has landed in court in a new lawsuit against Jim Jones and a number of record labels.

Hell Rell, born Durell Mohammed, was a member of Cam’ron’s Diplomats crew, which at one point featured Cam, Jim Jones, Juelz Santana, Hell Rell, Max B and others.

The lawsuit, which was filed in New York County Court, claims that Jim Jones, Koch, Tycoon Entertainment Babygrande Records and E1 cheated him out of royalties.

Hell Rell signed with Koch/E1 in 2007 and released one album for the label, Hell Up in Harlem.

That album was followed with 2008′s Black Mask, Black Gloves, which was released via the mom & pop label, Babygrande Records.

Hell Rell recently expressed his grievances with his former group members, claiming that Jim Jones and Juelz Santana ruined The Diplomats.

Santana has defended himself and Jones against any wrong doing, claiming Hell Rell needed a Diplomat reunion for financial reasons.

Hell Rell recently inked a deal with Money Maker Entertainment/EMI to release his third official album, Live From Hell.

Live From Hell is due in stores October 6.

Source: Allhiphop.com



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