Meek Mill’s Tour Put On Hold By Judge

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Philadelphia rapper Meek Mill has been barred from touring for a month after a judge found he violated probation restrictions associated with a 2008 drug and gun conviction. Common Pleas Judge Genece Brinkley said Monday the rapper, whose real name is Robert Williams, violated an order restricting his performance scheduling and failing to properly keep in touch with his probation officer.

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Have We Outgrown Hip-Hop?

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When hip-hop legend Knowledge B. Born headed to the stage to finally receive his Hip-Hop Lifetime Achievement Award, he clutched in his right hand a speech written in graffiti that he had wanted to deliver for years. He planned to put the entire audience of rap superstars on blast for destroying the culture he helped create. But, when he looked into the faces of a room full of rich kids half his age, who were either half asleep or busy textin’, he just crumbled up his notes, said “Ya’ll keep doin’ your thing,” and left the stage. Leaving the crowd whispering amongst themselves, “Who was that old dude…”

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Drake To Scared To Confront Tattoo Artist

Rap News, Hip Hop News - Gutta World

Date: Thursday, January 12, 2012



The Drake tattoo that is as recognized as the rapper it was inspired by is still causing a stir, this time as a result of the artist who inked the permanent moniker onto a young woman’s forehead.

Tattoo artist Kevin Campbell, an employee of Will Rise tattoo shop in Los Angeles, claims the 25-year-old ‘Take Care’ creator sent security guards into his place of business to confront him regarding the tat. For those not in the know, Campbell is responsible for tattooing Drake’s name onto the forehead of a woman. Drake publicly denounced the act in an interview last month and he also threatened Campbell, calling him a “fucking asshole” and promised to “fuck him up.”

On Jan. 11, during a Twitter exchange with a user named @Matt_Kaleta, Campbell was questioned about whether the war of words with Drake ever amounted to anything. Campbell responded, revealing that the Toronto-born MC allegedly showed up to the shop he is employed at but failed to actually show his face. “guess you could call it sorted out. When Drake was in LA last, he parked out front the shop and sent in his huge security dude [sic],” Campbell tweeted.

Campbell then went on to interact with Twitter user @KingLACity, informing him that the ‘Headlines’ rhymer “sent in the troops” rather than addressing him directly. “yeah, he should have just let it go, I doubt anything would have come of what he said anyway. It just made him look silly IMO,” the tattoo artist wrote.

Do you think Drake should have faced Kevin Campbell himself? If the artist’s statements are indeed true, it would have been in the Young Money MC’s best interest to address Campbell rather than rely on security guards to test the waters. After all, his current lyrical war with Common has him skating on thin ice with critical hip-hop heads who believe he may truly be as “sweet” as the Chi-town rapper claims he is.

Common Says “I’m to Hip-Hop What Obama Is To Politics”

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“How can I say this? Fuck it, I’m the greatest!”

Common is pacing the room like a prizefighter, his left arm extended above his head as he mouths the first 10 words to “Sweet,” a song off his new album that is anything but. As the speakers rattle at Roc the Mic Studios in Manhattan, Common nods along to the rhythm and echoes weighty declarations like, “I’m to hip-hop what Obama is to politics,” and “I’m the franchise, so I rock my own chain.”

“Sweet” may be the cockiest track that Common has ever recorded, but it feels at home on his insatiable new album, “The Dreamer/The Believer,” released Dec. 20, 2011, on Think Common Music/Warner Bros. Records. Ditching the electronic vibe of 2008′s disappointing “Universal Mind Control” (G.O.O.D. Music/Geffen), Common has regained his soulful swagger on his ninth studio set with the help of No I.D., who produced the entirety of “The Dreamer/The Believer.” The project debuted at No. 18 on the Billboard 200 with 69,000 copies sold (according to Nielsen SoundScan) and scored favorable reviews from such magazines as XXL, Paste and Prefix.

Common had grown up in Chicago working with No I.D.-the producer was heavily involved in early Common projects “Can I Borrow a Dollar” and the rapper’s breakthrough, “Resurrection” (which No I.D. also produced in its entirety) — but the pair hadn’t stayed in close contact as No I.D. moved on to helm tracks for artists like Jay-Z, Ghostface Killah and G-Unit. After running into each other at the 2006 premiere of Common’s film “Smokin’ Aces,” the two bonded again, and in September 2010 they laid down a handful of tracks at No I.D.’s Los Angeles studio.

“Working on this, it was more like, ‘We need an interlude, we need an emotional song, we need a single/radio song, we need a club song,’” says No I.D., who was named Def Jam executive VP of A&R in August. “You can think about the whole process, knowing what’s there already, versus going in to work with somebody and not knowing what else they’re going to get from somebody else.”

Common had wrapped primary work on the album in March when an invitation from first lady Michelle Obama to attend a poetry event at the White House pushed him in the middle of a conservative media cross-examination. Fox News’ Bill O’Reilly and former Alaska governor Sarah Palin condemned the rapper’s track “A Song for Assata,” which focuses on the controversial conviction of former Black Panther member Assata Shakur and appears on his fourth album, “Like Water for Chocolate,” as a plea for Shakur, who has maintained her innocence in the 1973 killing of a New Jersey police officer. Common, who attended the May 11 reading without incident, says the media scrutiny simply helped spread the message of “A Song for Assata.” “Even if they did delve into my lyrics, they’d see that I was speaking up against police brutality,” he says.


The political controversy certainly didn’t scare away Warner Bros. Records: After spending a decade on Universal Music (and the past seven years under the umbrella of fellow Chicago native Kanye West’s G.O.O.D. Music, where No I.D. served as label president), Common announced a distribution deal with Warner on June 24 for his own imprint, Think Common Music, which will primarily handle the release of “The Dreamer/The Believer.” “That was more of us wanting to take control of our assets, in a situation where we could own our masters,” manager Derek Dudley says.

“The Dreamer/The Believer” was originally slated for a Nov. 22 release, but was pushed back to Dec. 20 partly because of Common’s commitment to “Hell on Wheels,” a new western TV series that filmed its first season last summer in Calgary, Alberta, and premiered Nov. 6 on AMC. Show creators Joe and Tony Gayton describe the rapper, who stars as a freed slave named Elam, as the hardest-working man on the set.

“He was the first major part cast in this thing,” Tony Gayton says, “and we wanted to be very clear with him of the privations he would be suffering during the production of this television show-that it was going to be cold and rainy, there could have been snow, and it’s a basic cable show and there’s a brutal shooting schedule. He kind of smiled and said, ‘I’m up for all that.’”

In addition to “Hell on Wheels,” Common stars in the forthcoming independent film “L.U.V.,” scored a supporting role in Disney’s “The Odd Life of Timothy Green,” lent a voice-over spot to “Happy Feet Two” and appears in a bit part in the ensemble comedy “New Year’s Eve.” The acting gigs have ultimately helped spread the word about “The Dreamer/The Believer,” with recent appearances on “The Tonight Show With Jay Leno” and “Chelsea Lately” used to promote both his acting roles and the new album.

Common will likely hit the road next year, and Dudley says the rapper’s camp has discussed the possibility of a co-headlining tour with Nas, who appears on the new album track “Ghetto Dreams.” “There’s nothing set in stone,” Dudley says.

The Most Anticipated Hip Hop Albums Of 2012

Rap News, Hip Hop News - Gutta World


The staff at Gutta World highlights 10 releases this year that we are personally excited about. And no, we’re not counting on “Detox” either.

After so many colorful releases in 2011, Hip Hop fans have a lot to look forward to in 2012. No, we’re not actually basing our hopes on Dr. Dre’s Detox or Jay Electronica’s elusive debut, the mythical merger of Nas and DJ Premier or the long-delayed complete reunion of Goodie Mob. Like any fan, we would love if any or all of those released before we purchased new calendars, but there are a plethora of albums already underway that have a ton of promise in making this year musical.

Younger artists who had powerful impact in ’11 as well as some “golden era” alumni keeping the hardcore alive are slated to make bold statements with their music this year, and the Gutta World staff sat down and compiled 10 releases that we can count on, and why we think they’ll make 2012 all the more exciting.

The Ecology by Fashawn


Few debut albums in recent memory were as potent and honest as Fashawn’s 2009 debut Boy Meets World. The independent release, produced entirely by Exile, helped rush the forefront of a West Coast renaissance of music coming from young emcees with wisdom well beyond their years. Late this summer, when the Fresno DXnext alum announced that he was going to uphold the formula with Ex on the boards, the Gutta World staff rejoiced. Expect colorful sample-driven sounds and common-man themes as the Young Santiago helps expand his legacy as one of the more resonant voices of this time. As Common, Talib Kweli and Mos Def all began as independent artists in the ’90s before reaching mainstream stature, Fash is another poised to have that kind of impact.

Trouble Man by T.I.


2010′s No Mercy felt like a rushed T.I. album, as the Grand Hustle founder was quickly recording as a free man before serving for his latest (and hopefully last) felonious brush with the law. Given Tip’s track record for every-other-album being outstanding (see Paper Trail and King), the album sharing a name with the Marvin Gaye hit sounds audiobiographical and brutally honest before it even nears roll-out. Hopefully the man who made Atlantic Records relevant to Rap music can go in and delicately walk that line with a mainstream-friendly album that still carries plenty of trappings.

The Kolexion by Bumpy Knuckles & DJ Premier


Dating back to O.C.’s Jewelz, Bumpy Knuckles and DJ Premier share a musical chemistry that reflects their strong personal bonds. Two “kings of the underground sound,” these masons of the East Coast Hip Hop sound have teamed up for a March album that’s fully collaborative. Whereas 2000′s Industry Shakedown was a mosiac from the likes of Pete Rock, Diamond D and The Alchemist, The Kolexion is a project the fans have been asking for and brings Premier back to one of the fiercest emcees of the Gang Starr Foundation glory years. We anticipate a mosaic of wisdom and aggression.

Live From The Underground by Big K.R.I.T.


Few artists have the ability to appeal to the streets and the college campuses as well as Meridian, Mississippi’s Big K.R.I.T. With two mixtapes that easily could have been albums held in the highest regard, the Cinematic/Def Jam emcee, like J. Cole has the ability to make an album entirely by himself that could change the face of Hip Hop. Given K.R.I.T.’s history of working with icons that influenced him such as 8Ball & MJG, Devin The Dude and Ludacris, even if that’s not the case, the expectations for this are high. Plus, with Sha Money XL (who made classic albums with 50 Cent and Game as G-Unit Records’ former President) having a strong hand in the project, this is an album that could prove to be another Def Jam southern game-changer in the line of debuts from Ludacris, Young Jeezy and Rick Ross.

Good Kid In A Mad City by Kendrick Lamar


After making the “album of 2011″ (according to us, anyway), Compton, California’s Kendrick Lamar is expected to go right back and drop another one. Good Kid In A Mad City, as its known now anyway, finds Jay Rock’s lil’ homie dealing with rumors of an Aftermath deal, Tech N9ne, Game, and Drake working with him, as well as a whole different place than he was in just a year ago. We hope the supporting cast is as obscure as they were last time (GLC, RZA, J. Cole, Terrace Martin), but that one of the smartest 24 year-olds you’ll ever meet has more anthems that carry Hip Hop out of its stupor.


God Forgives, I Don’t by Rick Ross


Few superstars have the ear for beats that Ricky Rozay possesses. Just as Teflon Don was one of the best-produced albums in recent years, we expect a refreshed (hopefully healthier) Rawss to make another gem. With the Maybach Music Group compilation and Wale’s sophomore LP being winners of 2011, this seems in the cards to one of the biggest voices and personalities in Rap since the 1980s. Moreover, like Drake and Lil Wayne, Rick’s guest-lists usually pack surprises that change lives, just ask Styles P.

R.A.P. Music by Killer Mike & El-P


Ten years ago, this collaboration would have sounded like a clunky April Fool’s joke. However, Company Flow-meets-Dungeon Family next year, as Brooklyn-meets-Adamsville. Mike Bigga and El-Producto have been at work on this album for years, and two of the smartest guys in Hip Hop music are expected to make joints that sound informed as well as experimental. Hopefully it puts each talent in front of audiences previously not exposed to their greatness. El-P’s track record with producing others’ albums (see Cage’s Hell’s Winter and Cannibal Ox’s The Cold Vein) is of the highest level. We are trying to get subs back in the trunk before this rolls out.

Pink Friday: Roman Reloaded by Nicki Minaj


The emcee with 2010′s “Verse of The Year” has proved herself to be one of Rap’s most animated lyricists since Busta Rhymes. While her debut, Pink Friday may have been guilty of trying to do too much, after strong appearances with Lil Wayne, Drake and Big Sean, Oneka is the one to watch in ’12. Mainstream Hip Hop fans should tune in to see this 2008 DXnext alum step in and give Lil Wayne a run for his millions as YMCM’s sharpest spitter.

The Make Believe Album by David Banner


2005 belonged to Houston. 2008 belonged to Detroit. 2012 may belong to Mississippi. The Magnolia State’s Hip Hop pioneer David Banner, along with K.R.I.T. may shake things up with brutal honesty over-top self-produced beats. After making ethery commentary on 2011′s “Swag” (an inclusion on The Make Believe Album), expect D.B. to come out vocally swinging. In late ’10, David brought out one of his strongest works to date in Death of A Pop Star. Now removed from the controls of SRC Records, this Rap veteran may do for ’12 what Killer Mike did for ’08.

Godfathers by Kool G. Rap & Necro


For years, Necro’s rhyme delivery has been compared to Kool G. Rap, and the Psycho Logical Records’ founder will proudly admit that the Juice Crew spitter is a deep influence. As not all G Rap works have sounded cohesive since Roots of Evil, hardcore Hip Hop fans can count on this merging of the musicians to sound grimier than New York in the 1970s. Meanwhile, this is a perfect vehicle for Necro to bring his brand of “Death Rap” and amazing sources for sounds back into the ears of common Hip Hop fans. As Riches, Royalty and Respect went under the radars of most, this is a perfect collaboration for two cult followed icons.

What albums are you most looking forward to in 2012?

Common Leaves Universal Records After 10 Years, For Warner Bros.

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Chicago rapper Common has inked a new deal with Warner Brothers Records according to reports.

Common and Warner Bros. co-president/CEO Todd Moscowitz made the announcement yesterday (June 24th), during an outdoor concert in New York.

According to Billboard.com, Common addressed the crowd in the Warner Bros. records courtyard, where he expressed gratitude for the new deal.

“I’m very grateful to be a part of this family, to be a part of this team,” Common told the crowd, which gathered to watch the free outdoor concert.

“We have very inspirational, exciting music to team up with you. We’re just open to what this change can bring,” Common said.

Common began his recording career on Relativity Records, which was eventually acquired by Sony Music Entertainment.


The rapper/actor released three albums with Relativity, including 1992′s Can I Borrow a Dollar?, 1994′s Resurrection and 1997′s One Day It’ll All Make Sense.

Common’s stint with Universal began in 2000, when he signed with MCA Records and released his first album for the label, Like Water for Chocolate.

Common, had been signed to Universal Music for the past 10 years.

His last album was 2008′s Universal Mind Control.

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