Former Hip-Hop Mogul Rosemond Charged With Arranging Murder

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Even when the man they called “Jimmy Henchman” was on trial earlier this month for running a cocaine ring, his ties to the feud that led to the murders of two hip-hop legends preceded him. On Friday, Manhattan officials charged James Rosemond with arranging the murder of an associate of the rapper 50 Cent. On June 5, Rosemond was convicted in a Brooklyn federal court of peddling millions of dollars worth of cocaine. Rosemond, 47, was indicted for conspiring with five other men to kill the associate, Lowell Fletcher, in 2009. “This has not been a good month for Jimmy the Henchman,” Raymond W. Kelly, the New York police commissioner, said in a statement.

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The Game’s Manager, Jimmy Rosemond, Turns Himself In To The FEDs

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The Game’s manager, Jimmy “Henchman” Rosemond, turned himself in to the FEDs yesterday (May 23) for his alleged involvement in a cocaine drug ring. The Czar Entertainment Co-CEO manages a slew of talent like Sean Kingston, Brandy, Akon and Mike Tyson; he recently came forward in an interview with XXLmag.com on the matter:

“With the Name of God, the Gracious, the Merciful I have decided to break my silence to address slanderous media once and for all. Firstly, I want to apologize to every music artist and executive I’ve worked with. In addition, I apologize to my family and friends who have had to endure this horrible situation.

The events over the past week, to say the least, have caught me off guard. Although I have been aware of an investigation-taking place over the last four years, I was never informed that an arrest warrant had been issued in my name. I first learned about that warrant through the media when the news was released last week.

The purpose of this statement is not to assert some kind of grandiose conspiracy theory, but I will state some facts. These prosecutors have already begun my trial through the media and I’m releasing this statement in order to set the record straight. I just want a fair trial. I came up from nothing and made some mistakes early in my life of which I have already served time. Since then I have worked hard to establish my career in the music industry only to be targeted by these opportunistic prosecutors with a personal vendetta against me.

I would like to expose the two prosecutors spearheading this slanderous and trumped up case against me. The first, prosecutor Todd Kaminsky, is a 33-year-old White hip-hop head that if he weren’t a lawyer he would probably be a member of the Beastie Boys. Second, Carolyn Porkony, who failed in convicting the Murder Inc. Irv Gotti brothers on, trumped up charges of money laundering. Both have a personal stake in pursuing me and will stop at nothing to bring down an innocent man.


I have endured slanderous media for quite some time. Last year, in their frustration, they employed Chuck Phillips and the Daily News to write baseless stories in the media saying I was a snitch (but never mentioned or produced one person I ‘snitched’ on) to hopefully get people to start cooperating with their bogus investigation. Chuck Phillips started a campaign against me and wrote dozens of letters to inmates serving considerable time in federal prison begging them to cooperate. When those tactics didn’t work, they subpoenaed every person that knew me or worked with me in the music industry, including my accountants, lawyers, secretary, etc.

What compels me to expose this is that I know if I don’t I will not get a fair trial. Todd Kaminsky is hanging his hat on this case and has gone beyond his office to make sure he sensationalizes this to propel himself to some high-end law firm or political office. This is obvious from the deals he has already given his ‘witnesses’ to testify against me. Henry “Black” Butler, a known rolling 60’s gang member, and wife Leah Daniels who are Kaminsky’s star ‘witnesses’ were arrested with drugs and machine guns in Los Angeles. Butler was promised five years and his wife got her case dismissed in exchange for implicating me in their operation. I know nothing of Butler’s criminal activities and was never involved with him concerning those criminal activities. I just know him as a self-proclaimed gangbanger who told jokes all the time and worked for Loud Records in the 90’s. They leaked all this false information about me to the media and left out the truth that Henry Butler denied my involvement until he was promised a reduced sentence of five years if he included me in his operations. There’s absolutely no evidence that supports my involvement in any of this, yet I have been implicated with someone I have no associations with. Through our own investigations, we have compiled a lot of information that proves the prosecutors are overly zealous and aggressive, not to mention unconstitutional. They gave witnesses immunity and have gone as far as to threaten individuals with indictments if they didn’t talk to them about me and corroborate their tales. For instance, Ali “Zo” Adam, whose serving 18 years was offered a lesser sentence and the witness protection program if he testified against me. He refused saying he couldn’t live with the lie but admitted he was tempted by the offer. Many were tempted with the prospect of freedom and hence a case with no evidence was born against me. THIS IS NOT JUSTICE.

Khalil Abdullah’s indictment was leaked in the media as well. I never saw my name on that indictment, and I don’t know what I have to do with whatever he’s been indicted for. Up to now I don’t know what I may be charged with or what crime I’ve committed. For the last 10 years I’ve dedicated myself to servicing the music community but because of my so-called ‘checkered past’, I’ve become an easy target for prosecutors Todd Kaminsky and Carolyn Porkony, not to mention fiction writers like Chuck Phillips and his Daily News cohorts.

If the government is relying on informants like Winston “Winnie” Harris, a convicted drug dealer and Jamaican deportee, who came to me and motioned via hand signal that he was forced to wear a wire and begged me to skip town or Dexter Isaac who is serving life in prison plus 30 years then I’m sure I will not be offered a fair trial. Where’s the real proof that I have committed these crimes? I just want my fair trial and to not be railroaded as they so eagerly want to do.

A fair trial is afforded by the constitution and witnesses should be forthright without pressure or duress. That’s all I want and I’ll turn myself in today.

Again, I apologize to my peers, artists and family for being subjected to all of this.”

Rosemond’s attorney, Jeffrey Lichtman, said, ”Although a federal prosecutor told me that there is an arrest warrant out, [but] they refuse to provide me with the warrant or a copy of the charges.”

This latest brush with the law adds on to Rosemond’s colorful past; he’s been imprisoned during the ‘90s and was charged with gun possession in Los Angeles a few years ago. Last year, Rosemond was exposed as a state and federal police informant dating back to the mid-90s. In the court documents, Rosemond’s attorneys asked for leniency in his weapon’s charge case because he helped Brooklyn prosecutors send a man to jail.

He received a lot of backlash in the Hip-Hop Community because of his alleged snitching — something viewed negatively on the Rap scene.

Rosemond’s client, The Game, released an album entitled Stop Snitchin/Stop Lyin in 2005 voicing his hatred towards anyone helping law enforcement officials. Rosemond denies ever cooperating with officials on any case and staunchly proclaims his innocence in the drug ring conspiracy.

Czar Entertainment was in the midst of filming Dead Presidents 2 and Cookout 2 before Rosemond’s legal problems began. Czar Entertainment couldn’t be reached for questioning and the charges remain undisclosed at this time.

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Tyson Talks Friendship With Tupac; And His Regret

Posted: Tuesday – September 7, 2010

When Mike Tyson looks back on his friendship with Tupac Shakur, he thinks about the rapper’s big heart, explosive anger — and the one regret he has about their relationship.

“He always wanted me to smoke weed with him, and I never did it, and I wish I did,” Tyson said in a recent phone interview.

Tyson said he declined because he was a closet smoker and didn’t want it to get out that he smoked the drug. Now, when he looks back on the lost opportunity, he says: “That’s my biggest regret.”

Tyson’s friendship with Shakur is the subject of a new documentary, “One Night in Vegas: Tyson & Tupac,” which airs Tuesday on ESPN (8 p.m. EDT).

The 25-year-old rapper was shot after a Tyson fight in Las Vegas on Sept. 7, 1996; he died six days later.

“He didn’t last long, but the time he did last, every minute, every tenth of a moment was explosive,” Tyson said.

The documentary chronicles their relationship, which Tyson said took hold when he was imprisoned in 1992 for rape.

“Every day, he would call me or get a chance to call me or send a message,” said Tyson. “He would get word to me in prison.”

By the time Tyson was released in 1995, Shakur would be jailed for sex abuse; he was released on bond later that year. When he got out of prison, Tyson and Shakur’s friendship deepened. Both found it difficult to find people who truly cared for them, Tyson said.

“Our problem was we always had to worry about someone betraying us, our closest friends,” Tyson said.
Friendship was so important to Shakur that he criticized Tyson when he selected a song from rapper Redman as his intro music at a fight.
“He said, ‘Don’t you ever play those (expletive) songs again, they don’t give a (expletive) about you,’” Tyson recalled. “When he said that, it pierced my soul. … I felt like I did something wrong.”

After that talk, Tyson decided Shakur’s raps would be his intro music for life.

It was partly because Tyson had chosen Shakur’s music as his fight music that Shakur went to Tyson’s fight in Las Vegas. He made a special rap for

Tyson’s big night. After the fight, which Tyson won by knockout, Shakur was to join Tyson at a victory party. But he never made it.

“I felt extremely guilty because I felt if he didn’t come to this fight, that would have never have happened,” he said. “It’s just so crazy that we had talked every day for a week.”

Tyson, 44, said the world never understood the real Shakur.

“He was probably a misguided warrior. He had a heart as big as this planet,” Tyson said. “He had so much love and compassion, and you couldn’t even see it under his rage.”

It’s because of those qualities that he remains larger than life in death, he said.

“He’s going to last until the time this Earth comes to an end,” he said. “I’m glad to be a part of his life and to have known him.”

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