Drake Is That Your Really You Watch

Drake dines at Sur

There’s no way in hell Drake took the $30k missing Rolex in NYC … he claims his version came directly from Rolex, not some jeweler in midtown — this according to sources. Manhattan lawyer James McMillan filed a lawsuit in New York, says the NY Post, claiming his $30k Rose-Gold Rolex Presidential watch with a diamond bezel went missing from a midtown jeweler last year. McMillian claims the jeweler wouldn’t return the watch and eventually sold his Rolex to rapper Drake.

Read more

Lil Wayne Talks Shit About Pusha T

wpid-birdman-lil-wayne-weezy-basketball-game-1

Rapper Lil Wayne believes that Pusha T’s new track, Exodus 23:1 is a diss against Young Money. Pusha T dropped the track Wednesday (May 23) night from his forthcoming solo album. Shortly after, Weezy took to Twitter (@liltunechi) and tweeted, “Fuk Pusha T and anybody that love em.” The track samples Notorious B.I.G’s What’s Beef? and has a ton of subliminal lines throughout it. “Throwing that flag up, runnin around like you hot sh–, taking half of everything you get,” the G.O.O.D Music rapper’s chorus goes. The song also features the lyrics, “Contract all fucked up. I guess that means you all fucked. You signed to one nigga, then signed to another niggaa. Then signed to three niggas. Now that’s bad luck.”

Read more

Drake Loses “Best Album” Award To A Christmas Album

drake-salute585

Date: Tuesday – March 3, 2012



The Juno Awards have made great strides in credibility in recent years, but that may have culminated in last year’s Drake-hosted crowning of Arcade Fire. The 2012 Junos took a great big step backwards — and a curiously unnecessary one — by overlooking Drake’s critical and commercial hit Take Care in favor of awarding Michael Buble’s Christmas album.

Perhaps sensing this impending award show train wreck, both Canadian superstars stayed away from the Junos broadcast in Ottawa. (As did Buble’s fellow Christmas album nominee Justin Bieber, though he accepted his Juno Fan Choice Award, presented by new protégé Carly Rae Jepsen, via taped message.)

Drake’s loss to a Christmas album is as egregious as Kanye West not being nominated for a best album Grammy for My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy. Up against two holiday records and a pair of critical failures from Nickelback and Avril Lavigne, it shouldn’t have been a contest. Buble’s Christmas album is good for what it is, but what it is is a freaking Christmas album. It’s hardly an artistic achievement on the level of Drake’s Take Care.

As an aghast Deadmau5 said backstage, “Really? Was it any good? I mean, it better be one hell of a Christmas album.”

The selection of William Shatner as host, after going for cool kid Drizzy last year, seemed like another potential disaster. But the 81-year-old self-described “recording artist” killed as host, joking about Deadmau Five, kicking Chad Kroeger out of his own band to form “Nickel-Shat” (sparking a brief Twitter trend of #CdnShatnerBands) and delivering a CanRock medly, in his inimitable sing-speak fashion, of Steppenwolf’s “Born to be Wild,” Bryan Adams’ “Summer of ’69,” BTO’s “Takin’ Care of Business,” Trooper’s “Raise a Little Hell” and Rush’s “Tom Sawyer.”

Feist, who kicked off the Junos march toward credibility in 2008 with her The Reminder-fuelled five-award sweep, did her part once again as she was named Artist of the Year, adding to the previous night’s best Adult Alternative Album and Best DVD haul and bringing her lifetime win total up to 11. The comparatively lackluster reception for Metals apparently didn’t touch her artistic cred as she beat Canada’s biggest stars Deadmau5, City and Colour, Drake and Buble, a fact she alluded to in her acceptance speech.

“It just keeps going and going, I’m just in shock,” Feist said onstage. “This category is of a very international nature, so I’m very thankful. I’m straight-up grateful. ” She later backed up her wins with a powerful performance of “The Bad in Each Other,” assisted by three drummers, a horn section, Ex-Constantines member Bry Webb, Broken Social Scene’s Charles Spearin, a bluegrass trio and some sweet pyro.

Backstage, she elaborated on her surprise. “I was completely 100 percent convinced that I was absolutely not going to win an awards,” she said in the press room. “I felt like those days were over and I was content to play, because that’s what I do. This is just exponentially more shocking than it was in 2008. That year there were so many wonderful things happening that nothing felt shocking because I was over-shocked. Now, this is the shock.”

Feist wasn’t the only nice shocker, of course. The Sheepdogs took Single of the Year with “I Don’t Know,” giving them three in total and completing the defeat of Nickelback, who went zero for four, a repudiation of the Vancouver rockers who had swept the Junos on their last album. (The Sheepdogs weren’t there, either, though their dream-slot opening for John Fogerty on an Australian tour is basically the best excuse ever.)

Similarly, Dan Mangan took a well-deserved New Artist of the Year — even if we were personally rooting for Diamond Rings — and Dallas Green took a similarly well-earned Songwriter of the Year for City and Colour.

With the absence of Buble, Bieber and Drake, the night’s biggest international star was Deadmau5, who lost in the Best Dance Recording category that he’s dominated for the past few years. But at least it was to one of the biggest hits of the year, “Hello,” the monster electro-pop jam by Dragonette and noted non-Canadian producer Martin Solveig. (He’s French, so maybe that half-counts.) The upset was acknowledged by Sorbara backstage, who said “It’s just that much more surprising to be recognized in a category with someone who is as big and powerful as Deadmau5.”

But the cheese stands alone and dance music superstar Deadmau5 got to close the 41st annual Juno Awards in appropriately spectacular style with an assist from veteran jungle MC Flipside and electro-pop star Lights, who had also lost the previous night in the pop album category. It ended on a blissfully high note what had begun with Nickelback’s egregious “This Means War.” So if the 2012 Junos were uneven, at least they built from a painful past towards an on-fire future.

Drake To Scared To Confront Tattoo Artist

Rap News, Hip Hop News - Gutta World

Date: Thursday, January 12, 2012



The Drake tattoo that is as recognized as the rapper it was inspired by is still causing a stir, this time as a result of the artist who inked the permanent moniker onto a young woman’s forehead.

Tattoo artist Kevin Campbell, an employee of Will Rise tattoo shop in Los Angeles, claims the 25-year-old ‘Take Care’ creator sent security guards into his place of business to confront him regarding the tat. For those not in the know, Campbell is responsible for tattooing Drake’s name onto the forehead of a woman. Drake publicly denounced the act in an interview last month and he also threatened Campbell, calling him a “fucking asshole” and promised to “fuck him up.”

On Jan. 11, during a Twitter exchange with a user named @Matt_Kaleta, Campbell was questioned about whether the war of words with Drake ever amounted to anything. Campbell responded, revealing that the Toronto-born MC allegedly showed up to the shop he is employed at but failed to actually show his face. “guess you could call it sorted out. When Drake was in LA last, he parked out front the shop and sent in his huge security dude [sic],” Campbell tweeted.

Campbell then went on to interact with Twitter user @KingLACity, informing him that the ‘Headlines’ rhymer “sent in the troops” rather than addressing him directly. “yeah, he should have just let it go, I doubt anything would have come of what he said anyway. It just made him look silly IMO,” the tattoo artist wrote.

Do you think Drake should have faced Kevin Campbell himself? If the artist’s statements are indeed true, it would have been in the Young Money MC’s best interest to address Campbell rather than rely on security guards to test the waters. After all, his current lyrical war with Common has him skating on thin ice with critical hip-hop heads who believe he may truly be as “sweet” as the Chi-town rapper claims he is.

The Most Anticipated Hip Hop Albums Of 2012

Rap News, Hip Hop News - Gutta World


The staff at Gutta World highlights 10 releases this year that we are personally excited about. And no, we’re not counting on “Detox” either.

After so many colorful releases in 2011, Hip Hop fans have a lot to look forward to in 2012. No, we’re not actually basing our hopes on Dr. Dre’s Detox or Jay Electronica’s elusive debut, the mythical merger of Nas and DJ Premier or the long-delayed complete reunion of Goodie Mob. Like any fan, we would love if any or all of those released before we purchased new calendars, but there are a plethora of albums already underway that have a ton of promise in making this year musical.

Younger artists who had powerful impact in ’11 as well as some “golden era” alumni keeping the hardcore alive are slated to make bold statements with their music this year, and the Gutta World staff sat down and compiled 10 releases that we can count on, and why we think they’ll make 2012 all the more exciting.

The Ecology by Fashawn


Few debut albums in recent memory were as potent and honest as Fashawn’s 2009 debut Boy Meets World. The independent release, produced entirely by Exile, helped rush the forefront of a West Coast renaissance of music coming from young emcees with wisdom well beyond their years. Late this summer, when the Fresno DXnext alum announced that he was going to uphold the formula with Ex on the boards, the Gutta World staff rejoiced. Expect colorful sample-driven sounds and common-man themes as the Young Santiago helps expand his legacy as one of the more resonant voices of this time. As Common, Talib Kweli and Mos Def all began as independent artists in the ’90s before reaching mainstream stature, Fash is another poised to have that kind of impact.

Trouble Man by T.I.


2010′s No Mercy felt like a rushed T.I. album, as the Grand Hustle founder was quickly recording as a free man before serving for his latest (and hopefully last) felonious brush with the law. Given Tip’s track record for every-other-album being outstanding (see Paper Trail and King), the album sharing a name with the Marvin Gaye hit sounds audiobiographical and brutally honest before it even nears roll-out. Hopefully the man who made Atlantic Records relevant to Rap music can go in and delicately walk that line with a mainstream-friendly album that still carries plenty of trappings.

The Kolexion by Bumpy Knuckles & DJ Premier


Dating back to O.C.’s Jewelz, Bumpy Knuckles and DJ Premier share a musical chemistry that reflects their strong personal bonds. Two “kings of the underground sound,” these masons of the East Coast Hip Hop sound have teamed up for a March album that’s fully collaborative. Whereas 2000′s Industry Shakedown was a mosiac from the likes of Pete Rock, Diamond D and The Alchemist, The Kolexion is a project the fans have been asking for and brings Premier back to one of the fiercest emcees of the Gang Starr Foundation glory years. We anticipate a mosaic of wisdom and aggression.

Live From The Underground by Big K.R.I.T.


Few artists have the ability to appeal to the streets and the college campuses as well as Meridian, Mississippi’s Big K.R.I.T. With two mixtapes that easily could have been albums held in the highest regard, the Cinematic/Def Jam emcee, like J. Cole has the ability to make an album entirely by himself that could change the face of Hip Hop. Given K.R.I.T.’s history of working with icons that influenced him such as 8Ball & MJG, Devin The Dude and Ludacris, even if that’s not the case, the expectations for this are high. Plus, with Sha Money XL (who made classic albums with 50 Cent and Game as G-Unit Records’ former President) having a strong hand in the project, this is an album that could prove to be another Def Jam southern game-changer in the line of debuts from Ludacris, Young Jeezy and Rick Ross.

Good Kid In A Mad City by Kendrick Lamar


After making the “album of 2011″ (according to us, anyway), Compton, California’s Kendrick Lamar is expected to go right back and drop another one. Good Kid In A Mad City, as its known now anyway, finds Jay Rock’s lil’ homie dealing with rumors of an Aftermath deal, Tech N9ne, Game, and Drake working with him, as well as a whole different place than he was in just a year ago. We hope the supporting cast is as obscure as they were last time (GLC, RZA, J. Cole, Terrace Martin), but that one of the smartest 24 year-olds you’ll ever meet has more anthems that carry Hip Hop out of its stupor.


God Forgives, I Don’t by Rick Ross


Few superstars have the ear for beats that Ricky Rozay possesses. Just as Teflon Don was one of the best-produced albums in recent years, we expect a refreshed (hopefully healthier) Rawss to make another gem. With the Maybach Music Group compilation and Wale’s sophomore LP being winners of 2011, this seems in the cards to one of the biggest voices and personalities in Rap since the 1980s. Moreover, like Drake and Lil Wayne, Rick’s guest-lists usually pack surprises that change lives, just ask Styles P.

R.A.P. Music by Killer Mike & El-P


Ten years ago, this collaboration would have sounded like a clunky April Fool’s joke. However, Company Flow-meets-Dungeon Family next year, as Brooklyn-meets-Adamsville. Mike Bigga and El-Producto have been at work on this album for years, and two of the smartest guys in Hip Hop music are expected to make joints that sound informed as well as experimental. Hopefully it puts each talent in front of audiences previously not exposed to their greatness. El-P’s track record with producing others’ albums (see Cage’s Hell’s Winter and Cannibal Ox’s The Cold Vein) is of the highest level. We are trying to get subs back in the trunk before this rolls out.

Pink Friday: Roman Reloaded by Nicki Minaj


The emcee with 2010′s “Verse of The Year” has proved herself to be one of Rap’s most animated lyricists since Busta Rhymes. While her debut, Pink Friday may have been guilty of trying to do too much, after strong appearances with Lil Wayne, Drake and Big Sean, Oneka is the one to watch in ’12. Mainstream Hip Hop fans should tune in to see this 2008 DXnext alum step in and give Lil Wayne a run for his millions as YMCM’s sharpest spitter.

The Make Believe Album by David Banner


2005 belonged to Houston. 2008 belonged to Detroit. 2012 may belong to Mississippi. The Magnolia State’s Hip Hop pioneer David Banner, along with K.R.I.T. may shake things up with brutal honesty over-top self-produced beats. After making ethery commentary on 2011′s “Swag” (an inclusion on The Make Believe Album), expect D.B. to come out vocally swinging. In late ’10, David brought out one of his strongest works to date in Death of A Pop Star. Now removed from the controls of SRC Records, this Rap veteran may do for ’12 what Killer Mike did for ’08.

Godfathers by Kool G. Rap & Necro


For years, Necro’s rhyme delivery has been compared to Kool G. Rap, and the Psycho Logical Records’ founder will proudly admit that the Juice Crew spitter is a deep influence. As not all G Rap works have sounded cohesive since Roots of Evil, hardcore Hip Hop fans can count on this merging of the musicians to sound grimier than New York in the 1970s. Meanwhile, this is a perfect vehicle for Necro to bring his brand of “Death Rap” and amazing sources for sounds back into the ears of common Hip Hop fans. As Riches, Royalty and Respect went under the radars of most, this is a perfect collaboration for two cult followed icons.

What albums are you most looking forward to in 2012?

DRAKE – Take Care

drake-broody-official-take-care-cover-art

Take Care is an unbelievably plush album. Not only are the soundscapes on the album orchestral, ethereal, but the tone of the album is equally emotionally indulgent, Drake adopting the position of a somewhat world-weary player. The tone is set unmistakably with the opening track, Over My Dead Body, a piano-chord rich number. Drake boasts of his success, detailing a sense of disaffection in equal measure: “I was drinking at the Palms last night/ Ended up losing everything that I came with,” he raps, before adding, “Feel like I been here before, huh/ Still got ten years to go, huh.” It’s a tone that stays throughout. Even whilst he’s boasting of his lyricism, his album success, on tracks like Headlines and Crew Love, there’s a note of mournfulness, of predictability, about this game. The Weeknd’s verses on Crew Love is a particularly wistful, ethereal addition.

Read more
© 2013 GUTTA WORLD MAGAZINE by GW Industries