EXCLUSIVE: Prisoner Says He Was Involved In 1994 Robbery & Shooting Of Tupac Shakur

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A man has admitted to being involved in the attack on rap star Tupac Shakur in 1994, inside Manhattan’s Quad Studios in November of 1994, after allegedly being paid $2,500 dollars by James “Jimmy Henchman” Rosemond.

Dexter Isaac, a former friend of Rosemond, is an inmate currently serving life in prison for murder, robbery and other offenses.

Isaac came forward Wednesday (June 15th) with the information on the eve of what would be Tupac’s 40th birthday.

He confessed to his involvement in the November 30th, 1994 robbery of Tupac Shakur to AllHipHop.com, after Jimmy Henchman identified him in a statement, relating to Henchman’s indictment for dealing numerous kilos of cocaine.

“I want to apologize to his family [Tupac Shakur] and for the mistake I did for that sucker [Jimmy Henchman],” Dexter Isaac told AllHipHop.com from prison. “I am trying to clean it up to give [Tupac and Biggie's] mothers some closure.”

Henchman, who is currently on the run from Federal officials, claimed that Dexter Isaac, along with other incarcerated inmates were cooperating with the government in an investigation of his alleged drug dealing activities.

“If the government is relying on informants like Winston “Winnie” Harris, a convicted drug dealer and Jamaican deportee, who came to me and motioned via hand signal that he was forced to wear a wire and begged me to skip town or Dexter Isaac who is serving life in prison plus 30 years, then I’m sure I will not be offered a fair trial,” Henchman said in a statement released to AllHipHop.com in May of 2011.

Dexter Isaac told AllHipHop.com that he decided to confess to the robbery to prove Jimmy Henchman’s involvement, in addition to clearing his conscience for his role in the robbery.

Isaac said he was comfortable going on record relating to the robbery and shooting which resulted in Pac being reportedly shot, five times.

Since the statute of limitations had expired, legally, no one can be prosecuted for the assault at this time.

Isaac was a lifelong friend of Jimmy Henchmen, who helped the former mogul set up his first company, Henchman Entertainment, in 1989.


Isaac claims he never cooperated with the government in any investigation, and Jimmy Henchman’s allegations infuriated him.

Isaac, who is also from Brooklyn, has long been suspected of being involved in the Quad shooting of Tupac Shakur, along with an associate name Spencer “Scooter” Bowens, who is also serving a life sentence and another man named George Roland Campbell.

According to the confession below, Dexter Isaac not only knows what happened to Tupac Shakur’s jewelry, but he claims he is also in possession of the Hip-Hop star’s chain that was taken during the altercation on that infamous night on November 7, 1994.

The shooting on November 30th, was the start of a deadly feud that resulted in the murders of both Tupac Shakur and Notorious B.I.G.

Their murders have never been solved.

Isaac was indicted by the government in 1998 and was subsequently sentenced to life in prison for murder, robbery, fraud and witness intimidation charges.

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Soulja Boy Blames Racist Messages On Hackers

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Atlanta rapper Soulja Boy has issued a statement regarding racist messages posted on his Facebook page over the weekend.

Fans of the rapper were shocked on Saturday (June 11th), when he took to his Facebook page to lash out at people who were apparently leaving negative comments on his wall.

“IM TIRED OF WHITE PEOPLE DOING US LIKE THIS MAN!! THEY TREAT US SO WRONG!! fuck THEM MAN ON GOD!!…I’m gonna keep talking sh*t to these white faggots until they unlike my page. fucking weirdo stalkers!”
The posts labeled his haters ‘so fucking stupid” and claimed that white people were holding him down.

Today, (June 14th) Soulja Boy issued a statement to TMZ.com, claiming that his Facebook page was hacked.

“I wanted to clear the air and let everyone know that my Facebook got hacked,” Soulja Boy said. “I had administrators on my account that no longer work with me. The hackers used these old accounts [to] post hateful messages. This is not done by me or anyone on my team and I’m upset that I am being labeled as a racist and homophobic person.”

Nas Gets ‘Nasty’ On New Single

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There’s no R&B chord, A-list feature or catchy chorus. On “Nasty,” the first single from Nas’ 10th solo album, The Good Life, the rapper takes things back to hip-hop basics: hard rhymes over an infectious loop.

The song, which leaked online Monday night, is reminiscent of New York’s 1980s infamous park jams and starts out with a DJ asking the rapper’s native Queensbridge housing projects, “Are y’all ready to see Nasty Nas?” The question is, of course, rhetorical.

After Nasir pushed rap’s envelope in 2008 on his politically charged Untitled album (originally titled N—er), fans have clamored for new solo material. Thankfully, “Nasty” lives up to its name, as the track’s opening bars paint a picture of New York’s pre-gentrified crack era: “Late-night candlelight fiend with diesel in his needle/ Queensbridge leader, no equal.” Nas continues to toss numerous nods to the ’80s and ’90s on the Salaam Remi-produced track. There’s a shout to Queens street legend Thomas “Tony Montana” Mickens, the now-closed Tunnel nightclub and the late Notorious B.I.G.

Still, “Nasty” isn’t just a trip down memory lane. In fact, Nas remains with his feet firmly planted in 2011 as he reflects on his growth from a wide-eyed boy looking out of his project window to rap’s upper echelon, while still leaving room to grow.”We ain’t going backwards, we’re staying forward though,” Nas said in a June interview with DJ Envy on MTV2′s Sucker Free.


With the song’s lyrics, he stays true to that notion. “Silent rage, pristine in my vintage shades/ I’m not in the winters of my life or the beginning stage,” Nas spits before revealing his lustful interest in actress Antonique Smith, who played Faith Evans in the 2009 Biggie biopic “Notorious.”

Nas continues to fire off quotables in rapid succession. “I’m so high, I never land like Mike Jackson’s crib” and “Your flow’s cheap as limousine liquor” are just a few examples of Nas’ spirited wordplay.

If the new single is any indication of what fans can expect from the new Nas album, then for hip-hop fans, life is good.

What do you think of Nas’ latest single? Share your reviews in the comments!

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Tech N9ne Bringing Lil Wayne, B.o.B Into His World

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Among his underground following, Tech N9ne can do no wrong. But his fans, appropriately dubbed the Technicians, did get a little uppity when news broke that the Kansas City, Missouri, rap veteran would be collaborating with the likes of Lil Wayne on Tech’s recently released All 6′s and 7′s.

“No, I was not afraid of the backlash because I was getting it when Wayne said he wanted to work with me to [Hot 97 DJ] Funkmaster Flex when he was in Rikers,” Tech N9ne told MTV News during an intimate sit-down at his Strange Music headquarters in Lee Summit, Missouri. “All of my fans, a lot of my fans were like, ‘Oh no, don’t f— with Wayne. No, no, no, he’s mainstream and you’re underground — it don’t mix.’ ”

In October 2010, while still serving his eight-month prison bid for gun possession, Weezy revealed to Flex that he would like to work with Tech. For Tecca Nina, Wayne’s name-drop was an introduction point for new and curious fans, but for his long time die-hards, there was some skepticism.

“Different artists are supposed to hook up and make something beautiful, that’s what makes music wonderful, I think,” Tech said, defending against criticism that he was selling out. “I already knew what I was gonna do. When I get with these [well-known collaborators], the beats gotta say their names.”

The resulting collabo is “F— Food,” a raunchy track that not only features Weezy, but T-Pain on the hook as well. The song’s lyrical depiction of explicit sex acts will make it a hard sell for radio, but then again according to Tech, airplay was never the point of the union. “Everybody else is just going to try to put it on radio and big hit, boom and get their money off these cats. Nah, I just want to do beautiful music,” he said.


The Young Money CEO isn’t the only popular rapper to appear on All 6′s and 7′s, Atlanta’s B.o.B also lends his production and lyrics to the project on “Am I a Psycho?.” The dreary track is a far cry from Bob’s 2010 radio hits “Nuthin’ On You” and “Airplanes.” Tech remembers the feeling he got when he first heard the beat and often reminds fans of B.o.B’s oft-overlooked lyrical prowess.

“I chose it like, ‘Whoa,’ he did the beat and he did the chorus and I said, ‘That’s my world right there,’ and he wrote a verse for it. He’s a lyricist,” he said before citing Bob’s very first single, 2007′s “Haterz Everywhere,” as further proof. “That was thugged-out; that was gutter. I ain’t forgot B.o.B; he supposed to expand. But I know he can go, so we did ‘Am I a Pyscho?’ with Hopsin.”

Snoop Dogg, Busta Rhymes, Twista, Yelawolf, Kendrick Lamar and Stephen Carpenter of the Deftones also appearances on All 6′s and 7′s, but Tech N9ne puts any notions that he’s going mainstream to rest. “I brought people into my world,” he said.

What do you think of Tech N9ne joining forces with Lil Wayne? Tell us in the comments!

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Young Jeezy, DJ Drama Reunite On The Real Is Back

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With his oft-delayed fourth solo album, TM 103, in label limbo, Young Jeezy took it back to basics and reunited with DJ Drama on his latest mixtape, The Real Is Back.

Jeezy and Drama together, that’s a clear win-win, man,” Drama told Mixtape Daily. “N—as gonna stop actin’ like we ain’t built this. You like our style, you watch our style, we still own our style.”

As self-serving as his boasts may seem, Drama and Jeezy are credited with popularizing a unique brand of trap music that has dominated Southern rap since the early 2000s. At first, the rap/DJ tandem were inseparable, starting with their 2004 tape Tha Streetz Iz Watchin’ and their 2005 classic Trap or Die. A rift then started to grow between the two, but in December 2009 Jeezy appeared on Drama’s “Gangsta Grillz Radio” show on Atlanta’s 107.9 and they buried the hatchet.

Now the duo are back to work, returning to grace on The Real Is Back. “Me and Drama had a couple of conversations. When I came through the station, we chopped it up. We was talkin’ about doin’ another tape because we had so much history as far as The Streets Is Watching, Trap or Die, the list goes on and on,” Jeezy said. “It just was time, the streets needed it. So I had to get in the studio, had to do my whole one, two thing. As usual, he was on point.”


The tape is filled with street-centered anthems like the kinetic “How U Want It.” The track features a menacing instrumental on which Jeezy employs his patented slow flow and trap-raps. “How you want it, hard or soft/ Get ‘em in, get ‘em off,” the Snowman spits.

Lil Wayne appears on “Ballin’,” while Fabolous helps out on “Rollin’.” Still, Jeezy keeps his ear to the street and also collaborates with underground ATL spitter Alley Boy as well as CTE’s new signee Freddie Gibbs on “Run DMC” and “Do It for You.” There are no attempts at big radio singles here, just hard-edged street-hop.

“We invented the wheel when it comes to that type of music and that type of tape so we just did what we did,” Jeezy said of his reunion with Drama. “I felt like I wanted to take it back to what I do. Young Jeezy, nothing else. I’m not trying to sell this to nobody, I’m trying to do what I did in the beginning: go hard.”

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Royce Da 5’9 Responds To “Lighters” Criticism

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Nickel Nine explains why him and Eminem teamed up with pop singer Bruno Mars for the Bad Meets Evil cut.

Royce Da 5’9 and Eminem team up with Bruno Mars for the track “Lighters” on their Bad Meets Evil release Hell: The Sequel EP. But after the track leaked along with the album, the two faced criticism from fans for going out of character with a track they may not have done a few years ago.

“‘Lighters,’ the song with Bruno Mars, that’s basically just us showing versatility,” Royce told Bootleg Kev. “We didn’t want to make it too one-dimensional and we didn’t realize it until towards the end of the project where we were like, let’s make one or two personal joints. We got another one called ‘Take From Me’ where it’s kind of personal, and the rest of it is just us rapping. We gave one or two songs to where we showed that’s not all that we can do, because obviously, it’s reaching a bigger audience than I ever reached.”

Nickel Nine explained that it wasn’t meant as a snub to his core fans, but it was something he needed to do. “I don’t want that audience to think that I can only do one thing. It shows versatility on my end and it was a good way to set up Slaughterhouse. My core fans, the people who’ve been following me, the bulk of the album they’re going to be into. That’s what they want to hear me do. If I got one or two songs on there, of course they’re like ‘Aw you shouldn’t have did that.’ But you can’t please everybody.”

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