Big Tigger Brings Out Stars for Annual HIV/AIDS Awareness Show

Posted: Thursday – May 28, 2009 @ 11:14 PM

Radio personality Big Tigger has announced June 5-6 as the dates for his 8th Annual Celebrity Classic, which will raise funds for the nation’s current HIV/AIDS crisis.

The weekend will feature a vast array of professionals from the fields of sports, entertainment, politics, and health.

Confirmed activities include a youth sports clinic, silent auction, VIP luncheon, all-star basketball game, an all-white ball, and HIV testing.

The event will be held in Washington, D.C., where statistics show an alarming rise of HIV infections in African-Americans.

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), 75% of the new HIV cases are the result of individuals who were unaware they were infected.

Because of this, Tigger has made a concerted effort to offer free testing to all event attendees.

At the 2004 Classic, over 300 youths and adults were tested, marking a 57% increase over the D.C. Department of Health’s 2000 record of 170.

“More people are living with HIV and AIDS today than ever before,” Big Tigger explained to AllHipHop.com. “It saddens me to know that in, United States, the most powerful country in the world, the HIV infection rates are as bad if not worse than in third world countries. We need to educate everyone about the HIV virus and get as many people tested as we can because most HIV infections are transmitted by people who don’t know their status.”

Celebrities for this year’s event include Nelly, Trey Songz, Clinton Portis, Twista, Vince Carter, Caron Butler, Terrell Owens, Mims, J. Holiday, and Jackie Long.

While assuring attendees will be treated to a festive atmosphere, Tigger emphasized the importance of everyone knowing their medical status when it comes to HIV and AIDS.

“Do yourself a favor, come out and have a good time,” Tigger told AllHipHop.com. “Learn some stuff, get tested, know your status, and it’s going down [at] Big Tigger’s 8th Annual Celebrity Classic!”

For a full listing of events and locations, visit www.bigtigweekend.net.

 

Source: Allhiphop.com

T.I Publicist Says Marriage Reports 'Not True'

Posted: Thursday – May 28, 2009 @ 10:44 PM

T.I. Denies Marriage Reports By: Ismael AbduSalaam News on the marriage of longtime partners Tameka “Tiny” Cottle and T.I. (Clifford Harris) have proven to be false, according to the Atlanta star’s publicist.

Yesterday (May 27), Essence magazine broke the story that the couple had wed several weeks ago in a private Miami ceremony.

Rumors began immediately that the quick, unannounced marriage was done since T.I. would begin serving his one-year and a day prison sentence this month.

However, the superstar’s publicist Sydney Margetson today dismissed the reports as “absolutely not true” to Sister to Sister magazine.

Last weekend, T.I. completed an emotional farewell concert at Atlanta’s Philips Area, where he brought his children on stage to promise them a better future and father upon his release.

On Tuesday (May 26), he reported for his sentencing after being denied a request to be housed closer to Atlanta.

According to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Georgia, through good behavior T.I. can become eligible to have up to 55 days lowered from his sentence.

At press time, T.I. and Tiny are maintaining their two-year engagement.

 

Source: Allhiphop.com

United States To Afghanistan

Posted: Thursday – May 28, 2009

As if working for Special Forces in Afghanistan wasn’t enough to deal with, Na’gee still remains one of the top requested artists on the local radio station. “…My music gets requested so much I’m tired of hearing it..”. He refers to his days as “clockwork”. Even with the 12 hour time difference with the United States Na’gee manages to start his day at 2am to, “handle my business back in the states,” such as checking email, Worldstar, and Myspace checks. After showering he resides in his small room to either record a song, edit or map out what he will do next to boost his career.

After the daily morning rotutine he goes to work from about 9am to 7pm “I can’t really get into what I do because I work for the Special Forces” is what he explains when asked about his job. After getting off work and checking his emails and Myspace, everyday around 8 to 8:30 he has a meeting about the next mission that needs to be complete. As his schedule stays about the same all day everyday, he wants to make clear, “First and always remember we always get rocket attacked and it’s crazy cause I’m so use to it I just keep keep it moving and don’t pay it any mind.”
During Na’gee’s busy schedule he still finds time to perform for all of this local fans. “The first show was a last minute thing but I got crazy love! The second show was so crazy they didn’t have enough room to hold eveybody.” Na’gee says about his concerts. Not only can you catch Na’gee on Myspace.com and YouTube (to watch his shows), he’s currently on the top mixtapes on the net such as, Biggy Jiggy and Street Heat. He’s also working on a movie based around his music in the States and in Afghanistan.

Na’gee was also selected as one of GUTTA WORLD’s Top 40 Certified Gutta – Best of the Best Independent Rap artists.

From Car Bombs To Car Radios

The world is truly a Ghetto, a world that indiscriminately embraces and forsakes all. It builds a handful of heroes and destroys a universe of nobodies. At age 1, this environment is where Grand Scheem and his family began their new lives – migrating from Karachi, Pakistan to a 1 bedroom apartment in Opa Locka, Florida (USA) – a section of the Greater Miami area. Like many 3rd world immigrants, the marketing of America was a picture clip from “Leave it to Beaver”, but white picket fences are far from the reality. The negativity of growing up in lower-middle class America began to affect his household. Dad drinking, cheating on Mom – soon after came the divorce. This is the point when we ask ourselves, “Why is this happening to me?” The confusion of being American AND living in a household that clings to certain cultural values can be overwhelming.

Living life co-dependent on separated parents who refuse to believe that drugs, prostitution, & gun violence are low-income conditions that affect the youth of America, will only make you a stronger hustler. To his parents, the American Dream is having a stable job, because in Pakistan, there are no jobs. To him as an American, a job is being trapped. Acquiring capital and making investments was the ultimate career choice. Following the Jewish blueprint for success proved effective in the years to come. Then came 9/11. This tragedy affected more than just those that couldn’t make it out of the buildings – in fact, it affected the American perspective as a whole. Now the struggle of choosing a side to be on in a Black & White country is no longer the issue – for a taxpayer the Census Bureau fails to acknowledge. Americans who did not know where Wisconsin was, now know about the Middle East – but with a skewed perspective. His plan is to change that perspective.

The birth of Grand Scheem takes place in these Divided States of America. Facing the struggles of being a minority, “home” moved from Pakistan to New York to Florida to Texas to California and back. Scheem witnessed his first car-bombing at age fourteen, an episode he later recalls vividly, “…and the bombers weren’t too intelligent – instead of hitting their target (the police station) they blew up everything on the other side of the street. A man ran out into the street – on flames – and literally burned to death in the middle of the road. About four hours later, the Minister (equivalent to the Mayor) shows up to the scene, gives the family of the victim a briefcase of money, and that was that.”
Even the harsh surroundings of the Middle East couldn’t prepare Grand Scheem for what he would face in America. In Pakistan, “minority” is determined by religion – Grand Scheem was born a Catholic minority in an Islamic republic. In America, he remains a minority in a segregated society, determined by skin color and culture. Having to be searched at airports, being stared at in skyscrapers, being and around constant racial slurs & hate crimes, is the result of constant media misrepresentation. Explains Scheem, “The goal here is not money, but moreso to impact the perspectives of those oblivious to the truth.”

The stereotype of terrorism, though, is only one of many topics Grand Scheem addresses. Getting America and the world familiar with the face you see on television is important – know your enemy before you hate him. “…you even have groups like Green Day, Linkin Park, and Rage Against the Machine that not only see certain issues, but act on them in a major way”, explains Scheem.

Facing the same oppression that many minorities in America continue to battle is why Grand Scheem chooses Hip Hop to speak to those living the struggle. In its purest form, the Black community used Hip Hop to voice their disposition in America. Scheem influences, such as KRS-One, Public Enemy, Ice Cube, Paris, NWA, and Nas used Hip Hop as a line of communication to the people, and so shall Grand Scheem.

Americans have become more socially aware in 2005 – Hip-Hop, and music in general, is reverting back to its ‘realistic’ state of mind. The opportunity to get a million dollars worth of game, shrink-wrapped or online www.scheemofthecentury.com, is finally back – through Grand Scheem.

Country Boy Makin' Noise

The Years have gone by and we’re still hearing sort of the same old rap. I mean we’ve gone from our NWA’s to Tupac’s and Biggies. Now we have our 50 cents and Eminem’s. Our Jay-Z’s and Diddy’s. It’s obvious that the time has come for new and young artists to step into the rap game. I’m not talking about the J-kwon’s and Chingy’s. I’m talking about those young cats that are doing their thing on the Underground scene. I recently caught up with and had the opportunity to interview a young new comer, who is one of the many elbowing his way to the forefront. He goes by the name of “J-ROC”, which is self –explanatory he states. “Listen to my music and you’ll see the reason I’m known as ROC.”

GW: So…Where are you from? What small town is it that you’re representing?

JROC: “Well, I’m from a small, country town in South East Georgia, known as DuPont…
Most people call it the WOODYARD..”

GW: So what’s your family like?

JROC: “Country as Hell! I grew up in a house of 4. My mom, my stepdad, my sister, and my stepbrother TEZ. My folks provided as much as they could so I can’t complain. My biological dad wasn’t there but hey, his mf’ing loss!

GW: What exactly is it that got you into the whole rapping thing?

JROC: “Shit, I guess you could say that my stepbrother really is the one that got me interested in rapping. I mean he was always writing and rhyming, and I guess I just sat back and took it all in.”

GW: Who’s better, you or your stepbrother?

JROC: “He really can’t be compared to me! I’m on a whole different level. He’s tight tho’, but not as tight as me.”

GW: I understand that you’ve actually made about 3 underground CDs?

JROC: “Yeah, you might see me without a pen and paper maybe two days out of the week.” The cd’s were low budget cd’s but the hood(s) got the message and they know I “Raise Hell” with a microphone in my hand!

GW: So you’re constantly writing. What exactly is it that you write/rap about?

JROC: “Most rappers talk about their Escalades and Navigators on 24’s or betta, I don’t have all that, not yet anyway.” (He laughs and then goes on to talk about how people usually think of drugs, guns, and gangstaz when it comes to rap music.) “It ain’t all about that. It’s really all about real-life situations. I rap about things that I have experienced or at least have some knowledge of.” It would make no sense for me to rap about ridin’ in truck with 24s, and I don’t have that, feel me?” “I try to be as real as I can. Ain’t no fakin’ or frontin’ova hea.”

GW: What do you think about other rappers that are doing their thing at this moment?

JROC: “Good a$$ question. I ain’t tryna knock nobody for what they doin’ or whateva, coz Shit we just alike as far as trying to get our music heard and stuff. I won’t say any names, but I’m tired of rappers tryna be like other rappers. Now you have to be more specific than that. “What I’m sayin’ is that it ain’t right that folks out there being like the people that sort of put them out there and now they
making money off of it. I aint saying know names but we all know who doing this $#it. I ain’t the only one that feels this way. I’m fasho that there’s plenty otha folks out there that’s thinkin’ the same Shit. Just ain’t real enough to put it out there.”

GW: Well I was just about to ask is there is anything or anyone out right now that you aren’t really feeling that’s in the rap game. Care to share any names?

JROC: “Naw! I’m a soldier for paper, a certified paper chaser and I don’t call out names or talk down unless provoked! Feel me? All I have to say on this issue is that I don’t cater to those that bite off other artist(s). BRING YOUR OWN STYLE! BE REAL!

GW: How do you see hip-hop and yourself? Do you look at it as a career or you know, just a hobby?

JROC: “I definitely don’t look at it as being a hobby. I mean it could go as a hobby, but it’s more serious than that. Rhyming is something I do daily. It takes talent to rap. It’s a blessing that I’m able to do my thang. I definitely see hip-hop as being maybe a career or maybe some type of art.”

GW: Now let’s talk a lil’ music. Your CD, which is currently available at FYE stores, is called “Raising Hell.” What’s up with that? I mean what is it that a 20 year old needs to “raise hell” about?

JROC: “Go get tha’ album and you’ll see.” “On the serious tip, it’s all about me and my life. I’ve gone through so much to actually get to this point! I mean to a point where the world, not just Clinch County (which is where he lives), can hear my music and see what I got to bring to the table. And please believe I’m gone bring it!” “Raising Hell” is all about how hungry I am to get into this rap game. “I’ve been hungry for 20 years now. And until I get fed the way I wanna be fed, I’m gone continue to be hungry. This is like that one chance that you don’t normally get. I feel like I gotta take it and run with it,
ya know?”

GW: Now if fans wanted to listen to your music where would they go?

JROC: “You can check out www.WoodYardEntertainment.com. Whateva’ ya need to know is all up there.” Or you can catch me on Myspace.com/jrocartist, I gets much love on that page!

Now if those aren’t the words of a hungry, young artist, then I don’t know what is. I recently listened to one of his songs from one of the previous albums, and there was a verse that stated, “19 years old, ready to up and go, make some Sh#@ explode.” So maybe it is time for this young cat to rise to fame, and put it down for South Georgia.
If you’re living in South Georgia you should be well aware of what J-ROC is about. If not, maybe you should reread this article, go check out the site, and then go cop the album!

On The Grind – Organized Grind

Posted: Thursday – May 28, 2009 @ 12:08 AM

In 2005, a group of musicians, producers, and rappers joined forces to create Organized Grind Entertainment. Organized Grind’s goal is to be the label capable of handling every facet of the “life” of an album, from production to promotion, from artist development to touring. Organized Grind is not your typical record label. Not only do they produce, and release a lot of mainstream music, but Organized Grind also instills a lot of live instrumentation into their music.

In addition to their rappers writing contemporary club, and radio hits, Organized Grind encourages their artists to speak their mind, and not to fear venturing away from the mainstream’s lyrical approach. “Rap and Hip-Hop music was created as a protest music, a music that told a story, and a message that people could relate to,” states Jamin Kendall. Organized Grind Entertainment currently has two R&B singers, two rappers, and one jazz / funk group. They have two producers, (Jamin and D-Black), which have teamed up to create Black/Jamin productions. They also produce beats and whole songs for major and independent artists (for more info visit www.myspace.com/platinumfirm). D-Black has had numerous hits writing and producing including “Wobble Wobble” (Master P, 504 Boyz). They have produced and worked for such people as Dr. Dre, R Kelly, Snoop Dogg, and DJ Quik, to name a few. They are currently open to acquiring new artists, and can be reached at www.myspace.com/organizedgrind. As of July 09, Organized Grind Records is working on three projects.

Rapper Jamin is working on his first solo release scheduled to drop in November of 09. The album features, Snoop Dogg, G Money, E-40, and Big Syke. Saxophone player, Craig Shaw is working on his album The Craig Shaw Quintet. Black/Jamin Productions is producing Big Syke’s (Thug Life, Outlawz) new album, Mr. Incredible (Ride On’ em Records). Organized Grind presents a style that will essentially add to the state of hip hop. How many labels are all about catering to the true meaning of live instrumentation? Bearing this in mind, do know that Organized Grind is the label of the past, present, and future. Currently, Organized Grind is only operating in the western region of the United States, but you can also find Organized Grind on the World Wide Web. Organized Grind will be expanding nationally as potential investors come forth. Jamin states, “We are currently accepting bids from different investment firms.” For those, who feel like music should divert back to its original roots, Organized Grind would be the route to go.

I recently had an opportunity to get Jamin on the phone between studio sessions, and I want to share with you what is going on with Organized Grind.

GUTTA WORLD: What prompted you to start your own record label? 
Jamin Kendall: Really just what we was talkin about. The industry shifted it’s attention from Cali, and at the same time it’s a lot more freedom when you runnin your own shit. It just takes a lot of patience. But I got time, I ain’t trippin that.

GW: How was Organized Grind created?
Jamin:
Out of necessity. We all have been involved in the music industry in different aspects, and we all good at what we do, and we all love the grind and the hustle involved. So we just came together, and put all of our talents on the table, and organized all that into a plan, and we executing it now.

GW: Who are the founding members?
Jamin:
Myself, Craig Shaw, and D-Black.

GW: How has Organized Grind grown and developed since its beginning? 
Jamin: I’d say we a lot more focused now. We worked through a lot of the things you can’t see is gonna happen in when you start a business, and we more effective at being efficient.  Projects take a lot less time to organize and record. So it’s more time for me to focus on being an artist.

GW: What makes your crew different than any other independent label?
Jamin:
Our goals, our music, and our vision. Just listen to our music, and you’ll see what I’m sayin. 

GW: What is your ultimate goal?
Jamin:
To leave behind a legacy.

GW: If you had to describe your flow in a few words, what would it be?
Jamin: Well Rounded. I spit what I know and convey what I’ve been through. Nothin mo and fa sho nothing less.

GW: What do you think the advantages are in being independent as to signing major? 
Jamin: Well, like I was saying, unless you’ve already sold a lot of records, the only way a major will sign you is if they can take advantage of you, or if they fear another company will sign you, and they don’t want the competition. Majors sign acts for tax right offs all the time. It’s a lot of albums and acts that get shelved and never put out. But it’s so many young people that’s so eager to get in the business, they don’t stop to think about what might happen. A major label is like a bank, and an artist is a business. If your business is doing well, and has a good track record, the bank will loan you money at a good rate. If you have no record, they’ll fuck you. Same thing in the music business. So with the Internet, and home studios, and all these forms of distribution, it’s best to do your homework, put a plan together, and sell your own product independently until the majors come to you. Just the same way the banks do. Banks don’t care what business you in, if you makin money, they want some, so they fund you in order to gain interest in your business. The majors don’t give a fuck how good your music is. Are you making money?

GW: Have you been offered any major record deals?
Jamin: I have been offered the opportunity for major deals, but turned them down because they wanted to take too much control over my image, and music, and I’d rather go hood platinum, my way, than make millions of dollars for executives basically being their slave. I’m in this game for quality, not quantity.

GW: Would you reach out to another company for distribution or are you all trying to be strictly independent?
Jamin:
Fa sho. Cash Rules Everything Around Me, so the mo we makin, as a label, the more opportunity will present itself to actually work along with the major labels, and distributors, instead of for them. That is the eventual goal of Organized Grind Entertainment (to work alongside majors), but everything in due time. If you don’t have patience in this game, you might as well either get out, or sell out. Everything in its due time.

GW: You say you want longevity in the game, how do plan on obtaining that?
Jamin:
I ain’t in this game to be the best rapper. That shit is an illusion. You ain’t ever gonna hear me say some shit like that. There’s always gonna be someone that can do things better than the next man. And even then, that’s an opinion. My longevity is gonna come from me being true to my mission and giving people music that they can relate with. Giving them music that is filled with my emotion. Whatever that might be in the moment. Cause shit change constantly and we feel different from day to day. So not all my music gonna be about slangin, or some street shit. I talk about whatever I’m feelin in the moment, just like we was kickin it, drinkin, or smoking. When you put my music on, I want you to feel like we in the same room tradin conversation.

GW: Tell me about www.myspace.com/organizedgrind . Is it a beneficial site for you?
Jamin:
Yeah, Myspace is a powerful promotional tool and for the independent artist or label that shit is priceless. If you use it right, it’s like having an online street team. But, it’s like any other promotional tool, if you don’t approach it properly or follow up right with your fans, you gonna fall short. The harder you hustle, the mo you gonna benefit. That’s life. 

GW: Describe your label mates?
Jamin:
Balance. Everyone brings something real unique to the table. And that combination work well. We bring something all together new to the rap game, actually the whole industry. And at the same time we bringin something back to the game that has been missin for a while.

GW: How would you describe being in the studio with your crew working on your new album?
Jamin:
I Love bein in the studio, and all the cats I work with is extremely talented. It’s like God just blessed us puttin us all together like this. So yeah it’s magic. I couldn’t ask for anything mo.

GW: What is your largest struggle right now?
Jamin:
(Laughing) Finding a decent Cognac.

GW: Can you tell me about the upcoming album?  
Jamin: yeah it’s my debut solo album. I have done a few group albums, which has always been a good experience, but having full creative control, is a refreshing feelin. Me and D-Black have been plottin this project for a while now, we finally got all the tracks together. I’m recording 40 tracks, we ain’t decided yet whether it will be a double album or not. But we got some interest from major labels and publishing companies, and I been able to get some features from cats I grew up listening too, so I cant wait to put it out. In the meantime check me out at www.myspace.com/ogjamin.

GW: For kids who don’t live on the west coast, what would be your advice on how they could get their music heard?
Jamin: Be honest with yourself first about your music. If you can’t do it, you can’t do it. The industry is not for everyone. And it’s a lot of jobs in the industry besides being a performer. That’s one bad thing about all these home studios. All of a sudden everyone think they can rap, or produce. After that, my advice is to take your time on your project. Since everyone rappin, or singin, or producing, the market is flooded. So you want your shit to stand out. Don’t be in a rush to drop five albums a year of music that’s just aight. Put out one project that got all heaters on that. Make sure every track is well produced, it’s mixed well and mastered well. Pretend like you runnin a major label. Make sure the artwork is perfect. Don’t be usin no camera phone shots. Work on your strategy for release, meet as many D.J.’s as possible. And get your album pressed on vinyl. Basically do everything you can to make sure your album doesn’t look and sound like you made it at home.

GW: With the exception of a few, why do you think it’s hard for MC’s from CA to get put on? 
Jamin: It’s just industry trends. It’s not lack of talent. In the late eighties and nineties, Cali and the East Coast was hot, and started beefin. Then the south got crunk, and then the mid-west was the shit. Now we got the hyphy movement in the Yay. So Cali startin to come around again. I think Cali artists need to really come together more than they do to build. Especially on the independent level. It’s the grass-roots movements that can shift the trend with the majors, and help more Cali MC’s to get put on.

GW: Where do you see your crew in the next 5 years?
Jamin:
Success, Success, Success. Definitely international by then. I want us to be competing with the majors by then. In a sense we are now. But I want all of the majors to be scared enough of us, to want to buy us out.  

GW: How do you plan on giving back to your community?
Jamin:
The community invests into us, that’s the only reason we are, and will continue to be successful. That goes for any artist, so not to show your community a return on that investment would be detrimental. We have a lot of plans on giving back to the community, most of which I want to keep out of the press, so we get the least amount of resistance as possible. You know how people get when you try to do something positive. But we plan on giving back just as much if not more to the people that support us. I will say we plan on doing a lot of workshops, financial investments, construction, and youth activities. And every Organized Grind artist plans on being directly involved and very accessible to the public that basically makes us successful. So now you have it, Gutta World is the first to bring you an exclusive interview with Organized Grind’s Jamin Kendall. Be on the look out for Jamin’s debut solo album, and visit him online at www.myspace.com/ogjamin.

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